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Perhaps this is a bit more of a mechanical question then electronic, I hope it is not off topic. We have all seen the many electronics that use a barrel style DC power connector (I guess sometimes called Coaxial). I am wondering if there is a device that can retrofit this connector to make it a locking connector or to better lock it in place.

Specifically, I am hoping to find something other than locking down the cable itself, such as via a plastic loop affixed to the back of the chassis. That works ok but for my purposes I was hoping more for something that would literally lock the barrel connector into its socket. And again, I am hoping to retrofit existing devices, rather than cut cables / drill new holes.

Perhaps something that increases the friction already holding the barrel in place, such as some sort of small wedge or ring? Does such a thing exist?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Possibly a round magnet around the plug? Its not locking, but its in line with increasing the "friction" method, making the pull force higher. \$\endgroup\$ – Wesley Lee Feb 17 '17 at 20:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Is there a need to detach it? hotsnot works well otherwise \$\endgroup\$ – PlasmaHH Feb 17 '17 at 20:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ can you post a picture of the connector and the case? It's kind of hard to come up with things that use existing features of both when not being clear about what they look like (and there's very many coax connectors, too). \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Feb 17 '17 at 20:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ The connector has to pull out a few millimeters before it disengages. So, put the box against a wall; until the box is moved, the connector can't come out. \$\endgroup\$ – Whit3rd Feb 18 '17 at 5:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ Everyones feedback here is extremely helpful! I think I might try the magnetic ring. I can't mark an answer as correct yet till some testing but this is definitely a lot to try. \$\endgroup\$ – Dan Pisarski Feb 19 '17 at 1:30
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A liberal amount of hot glue on the connector and device panel. This would hold against vibration or light pulling. This isn't for preventing brute force unplugging. Also doesn't have superglue propensity to run, possibly getting between conductors.

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Get some heatshrink tubing. Slide it over one cable. Fasten the cables. Slide the heatshrink over the joint. Apply heat.

Unlocking isn't so easy of course but that's the point I guess.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Since one connector is on the chassis, how will heat shrink tubing work? \$\endgroup\$ – Mike Waters Feb 17 '17 at 21:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ We'll this wasn't that clear in the question but it might still work. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Feb 17 '17 at 21:41
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I've used Superglue Gel in the past to do this (do not use liquid Superglue) very task.
The Gel has sufficient body to be able to make a bridge between the barrel connector and the socket. It's relatively easy to break the connection so I consider it a semi-permanent solution.

If the distance is too great to support just a Gel bridge you could use a small piece of wire and bond each end (I have not tried this). It would then be possible to cut the wire and cleanup if you had to remove.

Of course if you are building product and need the locking capability for the power connection there are lockable barrel connectors available.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ +1 for the picture of the locking connector. Switchcraft is one manufacturer of these. FWIW - these are common in the professional Audio industry. \$\endgroup\$ – Dwayne Reid Feb 18 '17 at 0:20

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