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I'm trying to put in some ideal inductors and capacitors into my schematic, but there are two options: "Inductor" and "Inductor Model".

What are the differences between the two?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Try putting one of each in your schematic and see. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Feb 20 '17 at 4:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ThePhoton I will take a look at that, but if the end result looks the same? \$\endgroup\$ – Goldname Feb 20 '17 at 4:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ Have you tried actually reading the documentation? For example, by googling "ADS inductor model site:keysight.com" I got this. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Feb 20 '17 at 5:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ThePhoton yes I've read that. All I noticed are different parameters between the two, however. Did I miss something? \$\endgroup\$ – Goldname Feb 20 '17 at 5:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ The fact that a model doesn't have any pins? \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Feb 20 '17 at 5:09
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A model is not a circuit element. It doesn't have any terminals that can connect it to wires. It just collects some parameters so that actual circuit elements can be made alike by referring to the model.

It's not common to use models for passive elements, but it's very common to use them for active devices like BJTs, MOSFETs, or diodes.

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