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I have just learnt how PN junction work, depletion region etc. And finally I got what actually multimeter's diode test is measuring.

If there is potential difference between P and N material, and multimeter is showing it, will multimeter show 1.5v voltage drop if I put AA battery instead of a diode?

PS: I'd like to experiment, but I cannot loose my multimeter.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Go ahead. ..... Experiment. No issue will arise \$\endgroup\$ – Umar Feb 20 '17 at 13:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ If there is potential difference between P and N material, and multimeter is showing it It is a common misconception to think that you can actually measure the potential difference between N and P-type material. You cannot, see here: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/106496/… A 1.5 V battery is not a diode or a PN junction, it uses a chemical reaction to make that 1.5 V voltage difference. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Feb 20 '17 at 14:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes you can safely measure that with a multimeter. Look in the manual of the multimeter which voltages it can safely measure. Also make sure you use it correctly, i.e. measure voltage in voltage mode and current in current mode, use the right sockets etc. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Feb 20 '17 at 15:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ @FakeMoustache, yes, I've read that question before. It seems to me, that I understand how it works, and why there is no voltage across unconnected diode. I'm not saying to use voltage meter in my case. Please read carefully the question. \$\endgroup\$ – Qeeet Feb 23 '17 at 18:51

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