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I have a fatal short circuit (connecting 0V to 5V) on a very tedious stripboard project because I was given an 8-pin 2-row DIP socket (shown below) that has a short circuit between pins 2 and 3 (the two middle pins on the left-most side) instead of an 8-pin 2-row DIP socket where none of the pins are connected to each other.

Do I have to de-solder all ten of the sockets I have used and solder new ones in (painful) or could I simply manually cut the socket between pins 2 and 3 with some sort of razor blade (please recommend a better tool)?

8-pin DIP socket for IC to breadboard

Edit: it was suggested that no sockets are manufactured with short circuits so I am guessing there must be something wrong with the board. I have S-C, O-C and continuity tested the board (as well as made some extra track breaks) and still I cannot see why the top most rail is shorted to the bottom most rail... Most of this board was not by work but it is my task to finish it off (groan).

Topside and bottomside pictures shown below (shorted pins shown in red): TOPSIDE

BOTTOMSIDE

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    \$\begingroup\$ Do you mean that the sockets were manufactured with two pins shorted? I've never seen such a socket, so I would suggest you carefully inspect your board and soldering for shorts before blaming the sockets. (and pin 4 is a corner pin - leftmost pin on the top row in your picture). \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Feb 22 '17 at 23:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ Pins 3 and 5 are not on the same side. Check your pin numbering convention. \$\endgroup\$ – pericynthion Feb 22 '17 at 23:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ Referring to your picture, IC socket pins are conventionally numbered 1 to 4 right to left on the top row, and 5 - 8 left to right on the bottom row (when viewed from the top side, counter-clockwise around the socket or IC). Pins 1 and 8 will be at the end with the notch in the molding. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Feb 22 '17 at 23:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes, your link shows the correct numbering, and matches my description (at least, as I read my description...) \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Feb 23 '17 at 0:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't believe you, there is no sane reason for a socket manufacturer to produce such a part. I'm looking forward to seeing this board of yours :) \$\endgroup\$ – user1890202 Feb 23 '17 at 0:12
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Thanks to all the comments I realised there was a short under the correcting wires on the underside of the board.

Note to self: Manufacturers are not evil and do not produce shorted sockets.

Thanks again to all the commenters and the helpful tips!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Use resistors as wires (jumpers) and you will have fewer wires and solder joints to "debug" in the future. Good luck. \$\endgroup\$ – user1890202 Feb 23 '17 at 0:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ Please accept your answer so that this old question stops getting automatically churned to the top of the question list. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jun 5 '17 at 16:22

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