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Do gauze pads, the type used for scrapes or burns, cause ESD if they have a mix of polyester in them?

What if the polyester mix gauze pads have rubbing alcohol on them too?

They don't have any lint that comes off of them, thus making them seem like they'd work for computer electronics cleaning. (I'm currently looking for a way to get thermal paste off of a cpu.)

Thank you.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Why not a shop paper towel? \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 28 '17 at 2:01
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    \$\begingroup\$ Do they cause any sort of static when used? Thank you. \$\endgroup\$ – Smiith Feb 28 '17 at 2:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ As with other paper towels shop towels are made of cellulose, and cellulose is antistatic when humid. \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 28 '17 at 2:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ shop towels have too much lint for this purpose. \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Feb 28 '17 at 2:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ A small pad, handled by a grounded person, (1) doesn't have enough electrical capacity to carry a harmful charge, (2) is discharging to the holder, and to all the non-sensitive electrical contacts it touches. \$\endgroup\$ – Whit3rd Nov 1 '17 at 2:16
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Valutek’s ESD polyester wiper is constructed from 100% continuous-filament polyester in a double-knit, no-run, interlock pattern with a conductive fiber designed to dissipate electrical charge.

But if wipe is not the same as above but your paste has silver in it, then ok.

You can use a razor blade then wipe carefully. Lint free is good.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I remember cleaning a "smoker's" faulty motherboard from dirt with a toothbrush and IsoPropAlcohal. The leads on every chip were dust so thick it looked like felt between the leads. It worked after forced air drying. The dust contaminates the insulation of the IPA dielectric to become a good antistat. \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 7 '17 at 13:42
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I Use Kim wipes or ESD swabs in conjunction with Tech Spray flux remover to remove flux or thermal paste. If you have to you can then use some kind of lint free swab or wipe and spray a little flux spray on it to remove the last of the residue.

Here is the best method however, If you get the CPU cold the thermal paste will solidify and wipe right off. This works especially well with the evil white paste that gets onto everything, as soon as that stuff gets cold you can wipe a surface clean.

If its just a consumer CPU (thats pretty much disposable) then just use whatever comes in handy to wipe the thermal paste off.

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