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I wonder why I am absolutely unable to find this kind of wire/connector on DigiKey.

enter image description here

I can find easily the socket/header that is to be soldered on the PCB. But when it comes to a set of wires I can connect them to (red/yellow/blue/black wire on the picture), I cannot find it anywhere.

I built a whole project around this kind of connector thinking it would be easy to find them. Isn't this kind of connector (the female part) not supposed to be widely abundant and available?

Perhaps I just do not know the exact name and cannot find it, perhaps I'm blind, but I could've sworn it was common and widely used.

Thanks

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    \$\begingroup\$ Since you already know the Digikey part for one end, can't you just scroll down to the bit where Digikey gives you a list of mating connectors ... ? \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Mar 14 '17 at 14:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ ... you'll also need to be aware that the 'wire' side of that comes in pieces - the 'housing' which forms the body of the connector, and the 'inserts' which you crimp to the wires and actually make the connections. \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Mar 14 '17 at 14:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ Try "Online Catalog Home > Interconnect, Wire > Cable Assemblies > Rectangular" \$\endgroup\$ – pjc50 Mar 14 '17 at 14:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ignore my previous comment, that was my mistake. \$\endgroup\$ – DerStrom8 Mar 14 '17 at 20:44
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You need 'shells' and 'crimps':

Assuming this is 0.1" Molex KK, then here are the shells:

http://www.digikey.co.uk/short/32rdbj (example Molex part number 0022013047)

And here's a crimp:

http://www.digikey.co.uk/product-detail/en/molex-llc/08-50-0113/WM1114TR-ND/304071 (Molex part number 08-50-0113)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I really love you babysitted me through digikey because what you showed is exactly what I need. Yet... I have no idea how the crimp part works. I thought I could order this kind of connector with the wires and housing already bound together. Is the crimp part clipping firm inside the housing (solder less)? Do we have to solder it? Pardon my ignorance. I'm speaking about the part of the crimp connecting to the housing. Huh... I feel ignorant. \$\endgroup\$ – Yannick Mar 14 '17 at 14:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nevermind, I just understood. Thanks For the other ignorants like me : youtube.com/watch?v=8jcfD1UW8SE This is useful... \$\endgroup\$ – Yannick Mar 14 '17 at 14:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ You need a crimping tool to do it yourself (don't use pliers, it won't hold). Likely a vendor like Digikey will be able to sell you pre-made wire assemblies as a custom "value added item". \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Mar 14 '17 at 15:35
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Well, it might be common, but the whole point of these connectors is to be able to connect exactly the cables you need to a PCB; hence, most of the cases where you find a cable like that in a device, it has been custom confectioned for that device.

Since it doesn't make a big cost difference whether the plug manufacturer or a cable confectioning service do that, it's pretty common to see such custom cables. It might perfectly well be that digikey doesn't sell these as "standard" cables – since they're practically always non-standard.

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Single-pin cables in a similar style are commonly called "Dupont cables". Searching for "4-pin dupont cable" shows many shops that sell such cables with a four-hole housing (although that would not be compatible with "Dupont" cables).

However, "Dupont" is not an official name, and DigiKey does not appear to sell completed assemblies. What they have are single jumper wires with pre-crimped leads, which you then have to insert in some rectangular connector housing.

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    \$\begingroup\$ The (almost certainly misnamed) "Dupont" connectors refer to something else, those are fully-surrounding contacts (you could cover one in heat shrink) and typically come with unkeyed housings, but these are contacts for a larger post that only function when the housing opposes the one-sided contact's force, and the housings shown are keyed. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Mar 14 '17 at 15:37

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