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I'm wanting to use an ethernet switch/Phy LAN9303 to output 2, maybe 3 ethernet signals. I know that I need a 25MHz clock, supporting resistors and caps as well as the magnetics, but I want to know if there's a way to get around having to use an FPGA or processor for the MAC - or do I have the concept completely wrong? Is there an IC that has the PHY and MAC (and maybe the switch) all in one? Thanks

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    \$\begingroup\$ I designed a MAC chip for IBM's Token Ring 802.5 in 1983, a Token Bus 802.4 MAC chip for GE in 1985, and the first PC Ethernet board for IBM. By now there should be a chip. Ethernet was easy. Worst networking MAC protocol ever, but simple. So simple, an entire industry (i.e. Cisco) was built to band-aid the inept protocol. \$\endgroup\$ – Misunderstood Mar 18 '17 at 4:28
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There are switch IC's that use external phys (you need to have a separate MII interface that goes to a phy), switch IC's that have internal phys (the differential pairs run right into the IC), and switch IC's that do both internal and external.

A good example of this is the KSZ8873MLL/FLL/RLL

Depending on the IC you buy the Phys can be external or internal.

enter image description here

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It seems that the LAN9352 has 2 PHYs, switch, built-in MAC and host SPI interface. enter image description here

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Integrated MAC+PHYs are common. Integrated switch+PHYs are common. I've never run across all three in one chip, but I wouldn't be surprised if they exist. I'm not going to give specific part recommendations because EE.SE discourages "shopping" questions, but they're easy to find with a Google search.

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