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I have this power supply. And here is the photo: enter image description here

I named the DC outputs as A, B, C, D in red color to ask my question.

I saw in some bench power supplies they create dual supply.

Can I make a +24V -24V dual power supply by tying B and C together and making this joint as GND. So lets say I tied B and C and this is called BC. Im expecting A to BC voltage will be +24 and B to BC will be -24V.

1-) Can I do that in this case safely? Or tying B to C short the supply and damage it?

2-) If I can do that, do you recommend this way of powering a dual opamp for a good performance or do you recommend another IC solution to obtain dual power supply for opamps?

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closed as off-topic by Dmitry Grigoryev, Voltage Spike, Wesley Lee, DoxyLover, JonRB Apr 1 '17 at 9:35

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Dmitry Grigoryev, Voltage Spike, Wesley Lee, DoxyLover, JonRB
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ B to BC will be 0V not -24C, but BC/D maybe... What do you have between A/B, A/C, A/D, B/C, B/D and C/D ? Is A and B tied together? same for C and D ? If so don't do a BC because this is a short circuit ! \$\endgroup\$ – Tagadac Mar 28 '17 at 13:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ If each supply was isolated, then yes, I expect you could. However, it does not appear that this supply is isolated, so no, this would be a bad idea. \$\endgroup\$ – DerStrom8 Mar 28 '17 at 13:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ Don, in future, when in doubt, read the label. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Mar 28 '17 at 15:41
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Can I make a +24V -24V dual power supply by tying B and C together and making this joint as GND. So lets say I tied B and C and this is called BC. Im expecting A to BC voltage will be +24 and B to BC will be -24V.

No you can't. It is a single voltage power supply with two screw contacts per electrical connection. Read the data sheet - they are available as single outputs from 5 volts to 48 volts.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes I was gonna damage it. Just copied the same question here: I will need dual supplies for some opamp projects. What do you advice? Should I buy for example 2*12V supply or is there a more common practice such as using an IC ect? I have no experience yet where to focus. I want to convert 12V DC to dual in a cheap way and easy way where I can use for opamps \$\endgroup\$ – HelpMee Mar 28 '17 at 13:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Use a power op-amp to produce a "virtual" mid rail would be a simple solution. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Mar 28 '17 at 14:14
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Can I make a +24V -24V dual power supply by tying B and C together and making this joint as GND

No, that is NOT possible.

This is a 1 x 24 DC supply. If it was 2 x 24 V then the connectors would be placed more separate to emphasize that they're independent. It would be indicated on the device as well as: 2 x 24 V

I think terminals A and B are shorted already and so are C and D.

Get your multimeter out, switch off this supply, disconnect it from mains and put the multimeter in continuity mode or resistance mode. Now measure it. I give you 99.99% change that A=B and C=D.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You are right I checked with continuity and they are tied together. But I will need dual supplies for some opamp projects. What do you advice? Should I buy for example 2*12V supply or is there a more common practice such as using an IC ect? I have no experience yet where to focus. I want to convert 12V DC to dual in a cheap way and easy way where I can use for opamps. \$\endgroup\$ – HelpMee Mar 28 '17 at 13:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have a reasonably cheap solution for you: this kit from ebay: ebay.com/itm/… I got one myself recently after seeing it on Youtube. It's a kit so you will have to solder it together yourself (part of the fun ;-) ) there might be ready-made versions as well, I have not checked that. You can use your 24 V supply with this and you will get + and - 12 V +/- 5 V and 3.3 V from it. Ideal for opamps etc. How to assemble: youtube.com/watch?v=LyCYFk4Gh0A \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Mar 28 '17 at 13:47

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