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For my personel project, I would like to resize an LCD. I know that it is a possible to cut an LCD horizontally with a laser cutter.

However I don't know how they do this.

As far as I understand, I have to seal the LCD somehow. Can you please advise me how can I do that?

I am a PhD student in a technical university, so I can reach more or less all the equipment.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I highly doubt you cut an LCD down to size - if you could it wouldn't be easy and it's not worth the effort. Find one that is the right size in the first place. \$\endgroup\$ – Tom Carpenter Apr 2 '17 at 15:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ You're a PhD student and your research abilities didn't lead to a basic understanding of how LCD works, so that you'd have seen that this is impossible? That's not shining such a bright light on your uni... \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Apr 2 '17 at 15:18
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    \$\begingroup\$ Bort, I removed your mentions of "LCD screen" from your edit again. There's no indication OP is asking about things that one would call a screen, just about Liquid Crystal Displays. Thus, while in spirit and other aspects great, your edit changed the meaning of the question. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Apr 2 '17 at 15:22
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    \$\begingroup\$ To resize an LCD one simply covers up the unused area. A bit of black paper would work. Remanufacturing is not feasible. \$\endgroup\$ – Whit3rd Apr 3 '17 at 0:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ This is a bit late for April Fool's day. \$\endgroup\$ – Wossname Apr 3 '17 at 7:47
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That is impossible. LCDs are sealed at production, and there's technologically no option to cut them and then re-seal them.

I don't know where you get your infos on LCD technology from, but you might want to look at other sources. A short run down of LCD screen productions: https://www.crystec.com/crylcde.htm

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry but I am sure that lcds are able to be cutted. Please before making statement at least search on the web term called lcd resizing. It is basically pattented by Tannas Electronics. LCD s are bunch of vertical strips usually. Each pixel have transistors and capasitors to hold the value. You drive each pixel by horizontal and vertical matching. So when you program the lcd driver correctly you can use half of a panel for example. \$\endgroup\$ – mbt28 Apr 2 '17 at 20:50
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    \$\begingroup\$ Was OP was talking about LCD screens after all? \$\endgroup\$ – Bort Apr 3 '17 at 2:10
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If you really want to try this, why not try it first with a small commercial TFT or OLED display? They are very cheap, so you'll be able to mess up a lot. And they don't involve a massive number of pixels, which will be good for debugging.

They also use integrated driver chips which tend to support a handful of different resolutions; I guess that if you cut off the half which did not have any driver circuitry, LED backlights, display bias voltage drivers, etc, you might be able to just tell the controller it has a different-sized screen. E.g., take a 128x64 SSD1306 OLED display and cut it into a 128x32 one.

I don't think it would be very likely to work; there's probably a lot of very fine connections that you might accidentally bodge or short, even with a high-powered laser cut which maybe re-seals the top/bottom layers along the edge. But in that example, if nothing important broke, I think the SSD1306 driver does support a 128x32-pixel resolution and you might be able to just operate it normally.

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I find out how they made it already. It is very difficult patented industrial process. They are able cut the lcd from top or from one side according LCD matrix. The cutting should be in vacuum environment and with laser. Then they use a special tech to reseal it.

I think you dont even have to configure LCD driver because if you increase the blankings it should work out of the box with existing driver. Anyway it is almost impossible to do by a simple diy person.

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