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Here are the data attached on a Switching Mode Power Supply : Input : 230 V - 2.5 A PF = 0.95 ( Hence the power can be obtained as 230*2.5*0.95 = 546 W )

Output : 300 + 103 + 3.6 + 12.5 = 419.1 And at the line bellow the table it has mentioned 330 Watt as the Total wattage. How can this be possible ?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Were you expecting 100% efficient power conversion? \$\endgroup\$ – MarkU Apr 10 '17 at 20:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ That is a bit confusing as is though.. If you do the math for each voltage column you get 544.4w.. and what is total wattage.... You may need to look at the manual to figure out what combined and total really mean. \$\endgroup\$ – Trevor_G Apr 10 '17 at 20:50
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    \$\begingroup\$ I would expect 80-90% and that still does not explain it. \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Apr 10 '17 at 20:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ See also previous discussion here: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/244685/… \$\endgroup\$ – winny Apr 10 '17 at 20:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Were you expecting this 60% efficiency then, @MarkU, is that your cryptic point? \$\endgroup\$ – TonyM Apr 10 '17 at 21:05
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Even if 95% efficient , current rating is always for breaker load rating considering surge currents with even soft start on input. and does not imply efficiency.

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As is generally true for multiple output power supplies, some outputs can supply higher power if other outputs are more lightly loaded. The key to understanding is that total overall power dissipation in the supply (due to it not being 100% efficient) has to be limited due to net temperature rise, cooling and component stresses. In this case the supply appears to be designed to deliver a continuous 330W output power apportioned among its outputs.

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