3
\$\begingroup\$

I needed a new screwdriver set and found one called T4741SESD. In the product description it says the following:

Fully ESD compliant for safe use on sensitive electronic components

What is special about these screwdrivers that makes them ESD safe compared to other screwdrivers?

Before putting the screwdrivers in my toolcase I cleaned them off with some denatured alcohol, as this is how I usually clean my tools. While cleaning the blade/shaft I noticed the cloth became brown and the metal more shiny.

Is it possible I have inadvertently destroyed the ESD safe properties of the screwdrivers by removing the brown coating on the blade/shaft, or could this just be some oil to protect them from rusting?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Two types exists. Dave goes into details in this blog, electricalengineering101.com/eevblog-705-mailbag \$\endgroup\$ – winny Apr 14 '17 at 23:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ @winny could you be more specific? There is nothing related to my questions in the linked video. \$\endgroup\$ – Ken Hansen Apr 15 '17 at 2:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ The plastic in the handle. He talked about dissipative and conductive types if I don't misrecall. Is the shaft with the coating you refer to metal? \$\endgroup\$ – winny Apr 15 '17 at 9:43
5
\$\begingroup\$

What is special about these screwdrivers that makes them ESD safe compared to other screwdrivers?

The data sheet for that T4741SESD screwdriver set explains that:

The handles are [...] electrostatically dissipative to DIN EN 61340 5,1 & 5,2

That is the difference.

Therefore if you working at an ESD workstation, wearing an earthed wriststrap or footstraps etc. and pick-up one of those screwdrivers, your body will provide a high‑resistance path to ground, to discharge any accumulated electrostatic charge on the handle (or shaft) of the screwdriver. The same applies if the tool rests on a grounded ESD mat.

The idea is to remove any electrostatic charge from the tool and its handle, which could possibly otherwise cause ESD damage if it was moved close to ESD sensitive devices. Most ESD policies prohibit "non-process essential" insulators from ESD workstations, and ESD policies (and audits) may classify normal insulating tool handles as an example of that.

Is it possible I have inadvertently destroyed the ESD safe properties of the screwdrivers by removing the brown coating on the blade/shaft, or could this just be some oil to protect them from rusting?

No, you haven't damaged the ESD properties because the shaft does not have special ESD properties. I agree that you have likely just removed some kind of oil coating, since it came off with only light rubbing. The same thing happened with some ESD‑safe hand tools which I received from Farnell - they came with a coating of light machine oil on the metal parts.

Note: The static-dissipative handles on ESD tools means that they should not be used where they could be in contact with high voltages, since there is a deliberate electrical path (albeit a high resistance one) through them, to the person holding them.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.