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I have AC on an input (110V, 15A) and need to control the amount of power going to a purely resistive load.

Thyristor controlled by PWM seems like an option, but are there other/better ways to do this?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Light dimmers are doing this. \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Apr 19 '17 at 22:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you mean kHz range PWM or faster, that doesn't work with SCRs. You could call what dimmers do PWM, but most people don't. \$\endgroup\$ – Asmyldof Apr 20 '17 at 0:22
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It depends what the resistive load is.

If it's a lamp filament, then a phase shift thyristor/triac solution is suitable, as you probably want to avoid flicker.

If it's a heater, with a much longer time constant, then you can use a 'burst fire' controller, to control average power. That switches a number of complete cycles on and off. The benefit of this is it doesn't generate as much electrical interference as switching in the middle of a cycle would.

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TRIAC, or a bidirectional thyristor is a way to do it.

There are two ways of controlling it:

  1. Phase (Angle) Control (PHC), which is how dimmers work.
  2. Zero Crossing Mode
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