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I've recently read several articles about Li-ion batteries and found that all of them lack of integrity. So I thought, it would be a good idea to make a post here to gather all the information found on the internet in one place, so users of modern gadgets can use it like a full-and-supplementable guide.
From what I've found.

1.Usage and charging:
- It is free to charge the Li-ion battery whenever you want, as it has no memory-effect compared to Ni-MH ones.
- It is a good practice to not let your device discharge to levels less than 20% and avoid deep discharges
- Do not overcharge battery and don't charge it with very high currents. (If you use proper charging adapter, the electronics will do everything for you, so as user you have nothing to worry about here. It is also safe to charge your gadget designed to charge with 5V/1A using 5V/2A as well, because build-in electronics will cut the excessive currents, just be sure the voltage fits.)
- When used on cold temperatures (below 5°C/41°F) battery will discharge in faster and charge in slower rates, so avoid this, if possible.

2.Explosions danger. Li-ion battery can explode in several cases:
- Overheating. Avoid heavy usage on high temperatures
- Physical damage. Avoid using damaged batteries.
- Manufacturing defect. Nothing we can do here, unfortunately.

3.Storage rules
- Best condition is to store Li-ion batteries at a charge level of about 40% in a dry cool place. They have a self-discharging effect, so in best case during long storage it is good practice to recharge them for that amount.

Now 3 of my questions:
1. Did I forget smth? Any additions will be much appreciated.
2. I rly wonder if a properly stored battery can explode by itself in certain circumstances?
3. Is it safe to store old deeply discharged batteries at home, or there is a risk of accidental explosion and they should be re-cycled as soon as possible.

p.s. sorry for the long post but I hope, I am doing good things now.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by DoxyLover, Enric Blanco, uint128_t, laptop2d, Dmitry Grigoryev May 8 '17 at 15:51

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, but that is not how this site works. You ask a specific question and you (hope to) get a specific answer. Are you suggesting all the numerous other articles on this subject are lies? \$\endgroup\$ – Finbarr May 6 '17 at 16:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I asked a specific question (even 3 of them actually) and I'm getting a specific answers. No I don't say other articles are lies, I just say they are "lack of integrity" - this means there is no article where all known information about Li-ion batteries usage is gathered in one place. The information given here by me and the guy below (@alphasierra) covers more aspects than any of articles I've read so far. \$\endgroup\$ – fires3as0n May 6 '17 at 18:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ "Did I forget smth?" is not a specific question. \$\endgroup\$ – Dmitry Grigoryev May 8 '17 at 15:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ No, it is a specific question \$\endgroup\$ – fires3as0n May 19 '17 at 4:42
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Clarifications

It is a good practice to not let your device discharge to levels less than 20% and avoid deep discharges

Many devices like cell phones limit battery usage between 20%-80% SOC to get the longest lifespan, and remap that range as 0-100% for the user.

Do not overcharge battery and don't charge it with very high currents.

You can charge with "high" currents. It all depends on the cells you have. In general the higher the charge current, the shorter the lifespan of your cells will be.

Cold temperature

It's not that it discharges faster, less of the electrochemical energy is available, as the reaction that produces the electricity is inhibited by the low temperature. Once the cell warms up it's able to function normally.

Best condition is to store Li-ion batteries at a charge level of about 40% in a dry cool place

Sounds about right, it's a common choice for storage SOC. As for their self discharge, get a storage charger that will top them up once in a while or just remember to do it yourself. Their leakage isn't huge, I've left packs sitting for many months at storage charge which are still fine. Your mileage may vary.

  1. I rly wonder if a properly stored battery can explode by itself in certain circumstances?

No, something has to go wrong with the cell. Usually physical damage.

  1. Is it safe to store old deeply discharged batteries at home, or there is a risk of accidental explosion and they should be re-cycled as soon as possible.

If they're very discharged there's little to no risk of explosion.

Cells explode due to heat, usually generated by an internal short circuit or just having way too much current pass through them. If they're deeply discharged there's no energy stored to convert into heat.

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Explode? The battery industry prefers. the term "rapid disassembly"

The only safety issue I see missing is charging at sub-freezing temperatures.

I would add these

  • Heat the battery to room temperature before charging.
  • Limit the time the battery resides at full charge
  • Charge between 0.5C and 0.8C rates
  • Lowing the charge voltage limit will prolong battery life
  • Do not allow battery to get hot, cool is better than warm.

For longest life, operate Li-ion batteries in the 80% to 20% range. That is do not charge above 80% or discharge below 20%.

When storing, do not allow the self discharge to take the battery voltage down below 2.0V.

It is a good practice to not let your device discharge to levels less than 20% and avoid deep discharges

It's not that simple, and redundant. Below 20% is considered deep discharge.

I've recently read several articles about Li-ion batteries and found that all of them lack of integrity

This Slate article is pretty good The History of Lithium Ion Batteries Is Explosive

There is a very comprehensive and reliable source on batteries:

Battery University

Learn About Batteries – Content

These are some of the relevant links to Battery University:

How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries

Safety Concerns with Li-ion

What Causes Li-ion to Die?
How to Maximize Runtime
What Causes Capacity Loss?

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