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What is your preferred method to temporarily short two pins (DI, GND) on an IC chip while it is still on the board? Note this must be thin enough to allow the board to be replaced and stable enough to last through boot up and several software operations.

I am considering trying to cut conductive tape in a single thin shape to bridge the pins, or using a strand of copper, attaching with conductive ink and then taping it in place. Any better, easier methods you prefer with standard materials, again while keeping the chip on the board.

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    \$\begingroup\$ How much space? What kind of IC? Picture? \$\endgroup\$ – Oskar Skog May 16 '17 at 14:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ "strand of copper + conductive ink + tape"? Seems messy. Why don't people want to learn how to solder? It's a good skill to have and will probably be way more stable than that. \$\endgroup\$ – Wesley Lee May 16 '17 at 15:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's not that I can't solder, it's just a tiny space with very thin traces and I don't want to burn the chip. I was just spitballing alternatives. \$\endgroup\$ – BlancKopf May 21 '17 at 14:47
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That's normally done with a removable jumper included in the design of the board. After the fact, not so easy, though it can be done with a fixture that forces a couple of sprung pins onto pads on the board.

After-market, soldering on a rework wire is best, either at the pins themselves or, for a fine-pitched part, at the closest, or most suitable, point they are connected to.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Assuming no on-board features to assist I'd say solder every time, either at the IC or if it's a fine pitch part at some other convenient point. GND at least should be easy to pick up elsewhere. Other solutions just aren't reliable. \$\endgroup\$ – Andrew May 16 '17 at 14:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Good point about on-board features. There is a 2x6 set of pins that look like they could be jumpers and seem likely to be connected to the chip. Anyone have some ideas where I could look up the specs? I have tried general searches on the id (WD10JMVW-11AJGS0 2060-771961-000 REV P1 771961-F00) but haven't found useful diagrams yet. \$\endgroup\$ – BlancKopf May 21 '17 at 14:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ You were right Trevor. I wasn't able to find any board diagrams, but following the traces I could see gave me a good guess that turned out to be correct. Only a jumper was needed. \$\endgroup\$ – BlancKopf May 30 '17 at 13:35
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Find the next suitable component when DI signal is connected and solder a wire (if none is available - solder a wire directly to a leg of the chip - if it has legs), then find best accessible GND, solder another wire and connect the two to a switch.

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