0
\$\begingroup\$

I ordered PCB for my prototyping board and I made an inversion about the pin of the microUSB :

(If the bullets stand for the pin)

Original microUSB :

  • GND
  • ID
  • D+
  • D-
  • 5V

My board :

  • 5V
  • D-
  • D+
  • ID
  • GND

Does anyone already deal with this kind of mistake ? I solder cables to a standard USB 2.0 (without ID) but if someone has a more intelligent solution to this problem I'll take it.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Possibly bend the connectors pins if it allows it? I once did that to an SMD part and bending the pins (i.e. flipping the IC) solved it. \$\endgroup\$ – Wesley Lee May 22 '17 at 17:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ You could epoxy the micro B connector to the PCB near where it was supposed to sit. Then run short, fine jumper wires to the pads it was supposed to contact. It might work best if you epoxy it upside down (then the pins will be in the right order). \$\endgroup\$ – Evan May 22 '17 at 17:43
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ If you post pic of the related board area people may be able to give you more insights. \$\endgroup\$ – Anonymous May 22 '17 at 17:50
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ If it is a through-hole connector simply install it on the other side of the board. \$\endgroup\$ – Entrepreneur May 22 '17 at 18:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ I might recommend using a through-hole connector and bending the pins so that they can be soldered to the surface mount pads. This way you can simply flip the connector upside-down and solder the leads in the correct orientation \$\endgroup\$ – DerStrom8 May 22 '17 at 20:59
1
\$\begingroup\$

You have three options as I see it.

  1. Cut the end off a USB cable and either solder it directly to the PCB (preferred), or solder on a USB connector with a pinout matching your board (dangerous - don't use the cable for anything else!).

  2. Get the board remade with the correct pinout.

  3. Solder on the USB connector upside down. Yes, upside down. If you solder the shell on to the board, you can then use magnet wire (very thin wire) to connect the data/power/ground pins to the board. The reason for soldering upside down is that your connector then has a 1:1 mapping with the board (flipping over mirrors the pins). You may also be able to bend the pins of the connector down to reach your board (no wire needed) if you can find a suitable connector.

Option 2 is the best option long term, and I would do this anyway regardless of what you do in the short term.

Option 1 is ok as long as you solder the wire on to the board - wiring up a USB connector in reverse to plug in to your board asking for trouble.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I test the board without the micro USB connector but soldering cable and everything is working fine. I will remade the board with the correct pinout. \$\endgroup\$ – Henri Koch May 23 '17 at 14:20
7
\$\begingroup\$

You can try mounting a mid-mount micro-usb connector upside down.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is smart. +1. \$\endgroup\$ – Vladimir Cravero May 22 '17 at 18:15
2
\$\begingroup\$

It will be a challenge to mount a normal SMT micro-B connector upside down. Just get a reverse-mount part, like THIS ONE.

Maybe some vertical-mount parts will suite this situation too.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.