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I have a Danlers daylight controller supplying 0-10Vdc between dark and light, I conneced this to Meanwell LCM-25 LED dimmer but find the dimmer only partially dims the LED strip (5M x 60LED/m). I contacted Meanwell but no response as yet. Should I try an alternative as I assume unit is faulty? Is it hard/expensive to built something like this dimmer & daylight controller on a breadboard? Rupert

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Olin Lathrop, Enric Blanco, Voltage Spike, Dmitry Grigoryev, PeterJ May 31 '17 at 15:25

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Datasheets are needed to be read to see what your LED strip needs regards control. Just trying something and hoping is usually not a good plan. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka May 24 '17 at 7:41
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To drive a LED strip use a constant voltage source (12V) and a PWM dimmer that can be controlled by 0-10V input signal!

LCM-25 is a dimmable constant current LED driver. It is designed for use directly with high power LEDs connected toghther in series and in parallel. By aplying a 0-10V control signal this driver regulates its output current from nearly zero to maximum (depending on model). Below is a typical configuration for 600mA 14W LED array, that can be used with LCM-25:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

On the other hand the typical LED strip is something different - it contains resistors and is supposed to use with a constant voltage power source. A 12V white strip is made of paralleled structures of 3 series small LEDs with a resistor:

schematic

simulate this circuit

You could cut this strip whereever you like on the spcified marks as long as you power it with a constant voltage. Applying constant current here either will not glow the LEDs at their rated power or will burn them giving them more power as specified.

The proper way to DIM a LED strip is to use a constant voltage source as specified for the strip (12V or 24V exactly) and a PWM dimmer that will not control the voltage or current but only the time when the voltage is applied to the strip. Most PWM dimmers work on frequencies above 15kHz and the human eye can see LED flickering only when the frequency is below (50-60Hz).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks Todor. I found the Abeltronics Dim14 which I think is what you recommend. "PWM dimmer that can be controlled by 0-10V input signal" and it does12V or 24V, \$\endgroup\$ – rupert May 24 '17 at 20:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ @rupert, It looks OK. 12V or 24V depends on what LED strip do you have. You will also need a constant voltage power supply (12 or 24). \$\endgroup\$ – Todor Simeonov May 24 '17 at 20:09

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