0
\$\begingroup\$

I need to find a datasheet or a similar capacitor part. I am reverse engineering this bug zapper circuit and I need to know the pin out on the capacitor in the pic below. I also need help finding the data sheet for this sucker. I have tried looking it up with no luck. enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would expect a good plastic film cap >=2kV , C=223J. in polyurethane, polyester or teflon, TH with same pitch. Digikey has many. \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 27 '17 at 7:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ No such thing as polyurethane capacitor. Just saying. \$\endgroup\$ – Robert Endl May 27 '17 at 12:03
1
\$\begingroup\$

What pinout do you mean? As for electrical - it is a non polarized capacitor and can be placed in either direction. In China is well know as CBB type. Just google for CBB 2kV 22nF and see image results.

About dimensions - there could be some differences for different manufacturers.

If the original device is Chinese-desing and you plan to use it as a part of a serious project, you should be aware of some things. These capacitors are cheaper than MKP/MKT and often are placed in such circuits, that cut their life down. These capacitor work best when voltage across them is not altering too much. They can carry AC current (even 5A at 30kHz for 1uF/250V) as long as voltage is nearly constant (DC). Once you apply high magnitude AC voltage over this cap it will work for a year or two, hardly surviving through device's warranty period. Low cost circuits that power themselves thorough a capacitor from AC mains to get 12V or similar often use this type of capacitor on the AC side as a dropping capacitor instead of X-rated MKP capacitor. For example it can be often seen in cheap PIR sensor switches or emergency signs with battery backup.

My point is if this capacitor works under AC voltage you may consider changing it to other type.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does RippleCurrent indicate the relative durability of this cap? Or is some other spec the indicator? \$\endgroup\$ – analogsystemsrf May 27 '17 at 10:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ @analogsystemsrf I am not sure, but I think it is not the Ripple current because as I said this type of cap can work with 5A ripple current at almost DC voltage and fails with 100mA ripple current at AC voltage. It probably is because these caps are not rated to survive surges from mains. \$\endgroup\$ – Todor Simeonov May 27 '17 at 10:22
0
\$\begingroup\$

It comes from HBC, 22nF with 2000V voltage, and 5% tolerance.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.