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A three-prong to two-prong adapter is also known as "AC ground lifter" or "cheater plug". What is a single socket to ground-only plug adapter for electrical outlets called? It's a single socket adapted into a single metal ground prong, accompanied by insulated prongs for hot and neutral only to keep it firmly attached to the outlet. I've seen an example of one here called "Ground Plug Adaptor", whose socket accepts a banana plug, but I don't know whether the name is vendor-specific. That name doesn't indicate what goes into the adapter's socket. Googling "Ground Plug Adaptor" gives some cheater plug results.

I want this for purposes of grounding shielded Ethernet (possibly powered, e.g. PoE, PoE+, or passive PoE) cables' drain wire. In an industrial setting, these are grounded automatically when attaching shielded Ethernet keystones to patch panels, whose equipment rack has a grounding lug. I'm in a house, and my Ethernet keystones are mounted to a plastic multi-slot wall plate. I want to use the empty slot for a single socket keystone (maybe a banana jack) that bridges all the Ethernet cables' drain wires together, then connect that keystone to this ground plug adapter, and connect the latter to a grounded electrical outlet.

I also want this for purposes of grounding a person via anti-static wrist strap when working on electronics to prevent electrostatic discharge from damaging the components.

I'm in the United States.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Please explain why you want to connect to ground (earth), as this might affect the answers, or may be helpful when people explain existing answers. \$\endgroup\$ – SamGibson Jun 9 '17 at 3:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ @SamGibson , edited with explanation. \$\endgroup\$ – CodeBricks Jun 9 '17 at 3:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ the screw in the middle of US outlets provides a mechanically secure-able ground. \$\endgroup\$ – dandavis Jun 9 '17 at 7:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can't you just buy a regular rewirable plug and only wire up the earth pin? \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Green Jun 10 '17 at 3:02
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In the UK these are typically called earth bonding plugs, with the corresponding sockets called earth bonding points.

I don't recall seeing any that didn't present a banana socket on the output side. I'd expect any more detailed name including the output connector type to be manufacturer-specific.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ +1. I’m in USA. Does that matter? I’ve searched using your terms and found a UK plug with the phrases "1 Megaohm resistance" & "For use in ESD control" printed on it. Would this work in USA? Would this resistance protect user from electrocution (e.g. user connects & wears anti-static wrist strap) if the wall wiring's hot or neutral faults to ground? On the other hand, would such high resistance effectively be completely insulating & therefore useless for the purposes of draining ESD? \$\endgroup\$ – CodeBricks Jun 9 '17 at 3:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ Your question about the 1MΩ resistance is discussed here: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/265920/… \$\endgroup\$ – replete Jun 9 '17 at 4:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ We also have the less common (male?) variety with a wire terminating in a snap stud. \$\endgroup\$ – david Jun 9 '17 at 7:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for your upvote. It is interesting that someone else has downvoted, without bothering to explain why. Perhaps they couldn't explain why - after all my answer is easily verified - and were just using EE.SE as a mindless game of whack-a-mole on their lunch break. \$\endgroup\$ – replete Jun 10 '17 at 2:56
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The plug used for grounding network equipment is different from the plug used for ESD protection, and they are NOT interchangeable.

ESD protection earth bonding points include integral current limiting resistance. Typically 1-10MegOhm. This is a safety feature. If you touch something live, it prevents significant live current flowing through you to the earth point, killing you. It would not be legal to permit your employees to use a telecom ground bonding plug for that, and it would be stupid to do it to yourself.

A telecom/communications/network earth bonding point is a solid wire connection used to connect equipment to earth. This is sometimes done using a plug inside or adjacent to a networking cabinet. (It is more often done with a fixed grounding strap, or a three-pin plug also carrying power).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ this just sounds fearful and handwringy. OP isn't asking how to homebrew one, he's asking about the product that is made correctly with the resistor. \$\endgroup\$ – Harper Jun 9 '17 at 14:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Harper WTF? The OP specifically asks both about network grounding ("I want this for") and ESD protection ("I also want") \$\endgroup\$ – david Jun 13 '17 at 3:39
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They are readily available. Search for an "ESD ground adapter plug" or "ESD ground plug adapter".

You are correct to use a commercial prodict of good repute rather than homebrew. This includes a solidly mounted ~1 megaohm resistor to remove any possibility of electrocution from a miswired ground or contact with "hot".. This is a "goes without saying" basic feature of these devices, and no manifacturer could get a UL listibg without it. Make sure yours has it. As always, there will be cheap imoorted junk to watch out for.

I don't see a problem with them, cannot think of a section of Code (or UL standards) that would outlaw this.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ +1. I'm in USA. Do these violate USA's Code? \$\endgroup\$ – CodeBricks Jun 9 '17 at 3:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ Do these plugs include the 1M ohm resistor? Entering those search terms give results similar to the one in my OP, which doesn't specify whether it has resistor built-in. \$\endgroup\$ – CodeBricks Jun 10 '17 at 5:28
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In North America wiring, I'd call that "Illegal". It is certainly not recognized by the Electrical Codes. I've never seen anything like that for sale here.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Does the American Code render illegal anything not recognized therein? \$\endgroup\$ – CodeBricks Jun 9 '17 at 4:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ That sort of thing may not be Officially Illegal, but I don't think I've ever seen such a thing offered for sale in Canada. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Jun 9 '17 at 4:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Used, available and legal anywhere ESD protection is required. \$\endgroup\$ – david Jun 9 '17 at 7:03

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