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Can anyone tell me what the compenents ringed in red are please? I think they're resistors (The circuit is from 1978) but I can't find any reference to resistors in this form on the internet. If they are resistors can someone tell me:

1/ How to read the rating. i think it's top to bottom e.g. the ones on the right are 100K but a couple only seem to have two colours above the white stripe.

2/ How to identify a current equivalent.

3/ Why would the be in this form rather than the cylinder shape used on other parts of the board.

As can be seen from the bank on the right they have pretty much disintegrated; there is one at the front of that bank where the body has detached from the legs completely.

Thanks in advance.

Old components

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    \$\begingroup\$ Just out of interest: which synth is this? \$\endgroup\$ – Timo Jun 12 '17 at 12:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ 47 nF and 100 nF capacitors - looks like a jupiter synth circa 1982 (if it is a synth)? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jun 12 '17 at 12:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ Definitely looks like an Oberheim OB-1 ;-D \$\endgroup\$ – JimmyB Jun 12 '17 at 12:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Thanks all. Bonus points to @JimmyB for correctly idenfitying the Oberheim OB-1. ;-) \$\endgroup\$ – Jim Hudd Jun 12 '17 at 13:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ They are film caps, probably Philips brand, and they are broken from bad design (hole spacing too large) and sloppy assembly (the leads could have been formed). Philips spun off their passive components manufacturing long ago. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Jun 12 '17 at 14:58
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Those are polyester capacitors.

enter image description here

Figure 1. Image source: Electronics Sparkx.

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These are most likely capacitors. See for example here for colour coding description.

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They look like polyester capacitors, color codes in this link

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In this case you are looking at capacitors. For finding the values of the part you can fall back on E6, E12 and E24 ranges. In most situations you will find the part falling in the E12 range. So for the first 2 rings 10,12,15,18,22,27,33,39,47,56,68,82. This helps to find the first and second ring. The third ring is the multiplication factor. So a component with yellow - purple (4-7) and a multiplier 3(000) brings you to 47000 pF or as stated already 47 nF. Reading the rings in a different order does not bring you in the E12 range and is therefore wrong.

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