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What is the working power factor of induction generator? Is it leading or lagging ?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Andy aka, Voltage Spike, Chetan Bhargava, Dmitry Grigoryev, Enric Blanco Jun 17 '17 at 11:28

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ The power factor of any AC generator is largely dependent on the load impedance. It doesn't have a PF when no load is connected. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jun 16 '17 at 17:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please edit your question to explain what you mean by "induction generator". Add links if they will help but put the essential info in the question. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jun 16 '17 at 17:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_factor \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jun 16 '17 at 17:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ The rule is ELI the ICE man. In an inductive circuit (L), E is before I - but I don't know if this answers your question because I don't know the term induction generator. You are using the tag induction-motor which further confuses me. But anyway, that rule is always worth knowing. Motors are inductive, so PFCs always switch in capacitance to cancel out the reactance and bring it closer to a purely resistive load. I use Dr. Watt (developed by NASA) on my fridge and air conditioner, for instance. It brings the wattage way down as measured on a Kill-A-Watt meter, and they run cooler. \$\endgroup\$ – SDsolar Jun 17 '17 at 1:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ran out of space but need to clarify that Dr. Watt is a commercial product using technology developed by NASA and licensed to their company. They're getting harder to find these days. \$\endgroup\$ – SDsolar Jun 17 '17 at 1:46
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An ordinary induction generator connected to a power grid will draw lagging reactive volt-amperes from the grid and supply real power to the grid. It is simultaneously a lagging power-factor load and a unity power factor supply.

Power-factor compensation capacitors could be connected along with the motor to supply the reactive volt-ampere requirements of the inductive generator or the inductive generator plus the load. The induction generator could be connected to the load and/or the grid through an electronic power conversion system that could include provisions to supply reactive-voltamperes to the generator and the load.

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A generator does not have a power factor. On an AC system, it is the complex impedance of the combined loads that determines the power factor.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ But an induction generator won't start unless it can draw power in from the grid first, which suggests it has a power factor less than 1 because although it delivers power to the grid, it also draws a little back again in order to operate. \$\endgroup\$ – Malvineous Sep 29 at 14:30

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