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I need to change a DC jack to a different one (with long bushing).

I'm not to sure which terminal connector is what from the manufacturer's diagram.

The DC jack is a L712A from Switchcraft (Manufacturer Ref)

And this is the diagram they provide: http://www.switchcraft.com/Drawings/L712A_cd.pdf

How do I tell which one is which?

Edit: Here's a photo of the jack if that's any help:

Edit 2: Photo of the other side

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enter image description here

The sleeve shunt will disconnect from the sleeve when you insert a connector. At the bottom of the drawing they make contact. When you insert a connector that will connect to the lower contact. If you follow that to the right and up you see that it has its soldering tab at the top.

Typical use of the sleeve shunt is to connect it via a pull-up connector to V+. If the plug isn't inserted the voltage level at the sleeve shunt will be ground, with the plug inserted it will be V+.

edit
You can also test it by inserting a connector carrying a voltage. You'll measure the voltage between the central pin and the sleeve tab, but nothing between center pin and sleeve shunt.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ How do you tell it's connected to the top tab? \$\endgroup\$ – Ben May 6 '12 at 10:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Is the shunt the longer bit at the bottom (with the hook) or the smaller bit above it that touches it? \$\endgroup\$ – Ben May 6 '12 at 10:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ Experience with reading mechanical drawings helps. When you follow the shunt (the longer bit with the hook, the hook will make the contact with the connector's sleeve) to the right it bends to follow the housing, and at the top it reappears at exactly the same horizontal position. \$\endgroup\$ – stevenvh May 6 '12 at 10:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ right, makes sense, so in relation to the 2nd photo, the shunt connector is the one in back (with the bit following the housing visible at the front), right? \$\endgroup\$ – Ben May 6 '12 at 10:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ "Experience with reading mechanical drawings helps." Wise words :) \$\endgroup\$ – Ben May 6 '12 at 11:00

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