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I'm looking for a .1" pitch female-female or female-male header with common pins, i.e. all the pins are connected. I'm sure it exists, I'm just having trouble coming up with the right keywords to find it on google.

I want to use it as a cheap way to expand the ground and 5V terminals on an arduino without needing a whole shield.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ just take a e.g. 40-pin female (THT or SMD, both will work) header, and solder the terminals together. It's even simpler than what Dave said, although without a connecting wire it's more demanding manually to not damage the plastic with your iron. \$\endgroup\$ – user20088 Nov 22 '16 at 18:02
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For a cheap solution, I would cut one lead off of a resistor, then lay it across all of the pins in your female-male header. Then solder the lead to each pin. In the following image, the green line represents the lead, and the red ellipses are the soldering points.

enter image description here

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If you have your specs or already have an idea of your application, catalogs are better places to look for things than Google. From my answer on a question here:

Try exploring catalogs like the one from RS or TE's picture search.

Most catalogs will give you an idea of the keywords, specifications, and common parts the industry has to offer. Some are even better by providing you application tips and advice.

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To expand those ports I would probably make a small shield with a proto board and male headers to plug-into the Arduino. Then connect a female header on top of both the 5v and ground males and solder all the female leads together for each.

A less elegant solution would be to just plug the first lead of a row of female headers and bend/solder all the others together.

With both of these options the 5V is running through the Arduino so you should check to make sure drawing lots of current or back voltage won't occur. Otherwise you could get your +/- from the actual power source and run a line off to power the Arduino.

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