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I am developing a battery powered application. I need GSM communication there. The problem is that in most (I think every even) devices I find the required voltage is from 3.4V to 4.2V. I would really prefer the module to work on 3.3V steadily. Are there such modules? If not, what is the technological obstacle here? I would appreciate all help.

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closed as off-topic by Brian Carlton, Enric Blanco, Voltage Spike, Dmitry Grigoryev, PeterJ Jul 11 '17 at 12:36

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    \$\begingroup\$ What type of power source are you hoping to use? GSM modules have very high pulse power draw when transmitting, which many "logic project" mains supplies and primary batteries are unable to supply. These modules are really designed around the lithium secondary batteries found in the phone applications for which the technology is developed. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jul 7 '17 at 3:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I hve found out exacly that as well. It explains the 4.2-3.3V range \$\endgroup\$ – Bremen Jul 7 '17 at 3:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ The issue is not so much the voltage but the high current which will be drawn. Even if you reworked a typical breadboard supply to deliver 4.2v, it would probably fall over when the module tries to perform the initial high power (and thus current-hungry) transmissions. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jul 7 '17 at 4:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Its fine at this point- I do have a li-ion 2 cell battery for this. Thanks \$\endgroup\$ – Bremen Jul 7 '17 at 4:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ It needs a single cell, not a 2-cell. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jul 7 '17 at 4:20
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Simply add a boost converter to convert your 3.3 volt source to the voltage required for the GSM module.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Not so simply - are you aware that GSM modules are notorious for requiring around 2 amps when transmitting? \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jul 7 '17 at 3:31
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They are designed to run of a single lithium cell. Like all phones do. They sometimes provide the charging and management circuitry as well.

If you want a different battery chemistry, you will need your own power supply circuitry.

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