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Does a high voltage electrostatic precipitator power supply create a balanced or unbalanced electrical output in relation to the primary side/ground? If the device provides an unbalanced output, does the power come off of the negative or positive side? Here is an example of such a power supply: http://www.ebay.com/itm/High-voltage-electrostatic-precipitator-power-supply-with-400W-60kV-/152550032861. Also, here is a schematic for the power supply: Schematic

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closed as unclear what you're asking by JRE, winny, brhans, Enric Blanco, uint128_t Jul 22 '17 at 2:39

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    \$\begingroup\$ well, as you can see from the schematic, the transformer galvanically separates the secondary side from the primary, so you really can't talk about having anything relative to primary side ground (as that doesn't matter at all). Does that answer your question? \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Jul 7 '17 at 19:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ The schematic appears to be for a different power supply all together. The schematic is clearly for 3 phase input, and the one on ebay is clearly a single phase unit - that also has some controls that this schematic lacks. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Jul 7 '17 at 19:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ Dude, you make me nervous. 40kV and 10mA continuous is enough to kill you stone cold dead. You have yet to grasp that positive and negative depend on the ground level (which you verify easily and safely with a couple of batteries) but insist on playing with dangerous stuff. Please stop. If you don't care about your own safety, consider what could happen to others around you. If you get toasted and that thing stays on you've left behind a hazard for whoever finds your remains. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Jul 7 '17 at 21:03
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Joshua Guertler -

Please stop messing around with this stuff. You are going to get someone hurt. Why do I say this? Because your questions indicate that you have no idea what you are talking about.

Does a high voltage electrostatic precipitator power supply create a balanced or unbalanced electrical output in relation to the primary side/ground?

No. Or rather, maybe. But in light of the rest of your question, no.

Also, here is a schematic for the power supply:

And again, no. That is not remotely the power supply for the unit you linked.

So, you don't understand what balanced or unbalanced means, and you don't realize that the schematic cannot possibly apply to the eBay unit you linked to. (Or maybe you do, since in your previous question you referred to the schematic as being "generic". But in that case it cannot be "the power supply". Either way you are hopelessly confused.) Marcus Miller obliquely pointed this out in comment, but it apparently passed you by.

It's perfectly possible to make a HV supply which is either balanced or unbalanced, it's just that there is no reason to think that either term applies to the unit under consideration.

Please find somebody who has a clue about this stuff and take his or her advice. I'm afraid you're going to hurt yourself or someone else.

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The source is balanced differential output from a HF transformer but the load is unbalanced with HVDC ionizing particles may detonate more on the + terminal since electrons emit freely from conductors and transfer charge to dust which become -ve and discharge against +ve terminal attraction. Thus dust might detonate in the centre of the stack rod and be converted to a benign gas. ( just a hunch)

Thus since arc impedance is low compared to the capacitance and high R of the stack electrodes. It is unbalanced pulse current which creates large EMI unless a HiV CM choke is used with twisted pairs low ESL wiring.

The imbalance is due to the earth grounding of the stack and polarity of discharge on one side relative to the series current limiting impedance of the transformer.

The WYE 3 phase may be earth grounded at the Neutral or it may be floating Delta windings, but common mode coupling to ground at RF is makes it relatively low impedance high capacitance coupling compared to the earth grounded stack capacitance and inductance to the HVDC source. Thus high DM noise but shielded by the stack somewhat and more important, the CM noise of the feed wires , so attention to EMI must consider CM balancing at RF from 50kHz to 1GHz and discharge currents via the stack, which is not visible from the logic diagram..

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I once used a HVDC +/- alternated @ 1Hz commercial air deionizer with a 1cm pin to inside a gnd cone to precipitate dust outside a class 100 clean room. The spectral noise went from 1Hz all the way up to 1/2 wavelength of the arc length which caused excessive EMI coupling into sensitive magnetic circuits inside the cleanroom for large disk servo write/read verify on HDD disks. So I had to remove it . Too much EMI. In another case a large safety 1Hz flash Xenon tube during HiV transformer tests created enough GHz noise to block all cell phones inside factory. It must have affected the Rx AGC. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jul 7 '17 at 19:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Could I get a negative voltage off of the negative side if I grounded the positive side of the power supply's output? \$\endgroup\$ – Joshua Guertler Jul 7 '17 at 19:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes and I dug up the researchers documents and thats exactly what he did. His conclusion was that although particulate emissions were reduced vs 50Hz thrystor, they could have been reduced further with the -ve electrode by maximizing the electrode gap from 30cm . However this stack was drawing 50MW of power to remove the high coal dust and changes were not feasible. Yet they were still exceeding emissions. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jul 7 '17 at 22:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ The EBAY gadget is a like a 400W BIC lighter , while the schematic is a simplified version of a 68kW supply load current ESPI=1A and load voltage ESPV=68kV which is a blow torch. Unless you have worked with HVDC, you have a lot to learn on the risks. Be sure to current limit with and insulate with 8mm rubber coated wire. and 500cm BIL200kV porcelain bushings. DC is prone to partial discharge that can cause cardiac arrest from leakage fields spanning > 10 meter \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jul 8 '17 at 0:25
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There is not enough information on that eBay ad to determine whether the output is AC, -DC, or +DC.

You need to ask the seller about that, because those four flyback transformers might very well have built-in diodes that output +HV that are impossible to change! That was the case for many of the last CRT-type television sets, which were +DC and could not be changed. I have a whole box of those here somewhere, and they are destined for the garbage.

If there are no embedded diodes --and the output is AC-- then it might be possible to add some HV diodes so that the output is -DC.

Maybe you'll get lucky and find that the HV output is -DC, but I seriously doubt it.

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