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Please forgive me if my question is just silly. Really strugling to find answers. I have bought what i belive to be a dpdt switch. It is however a push button switch. It is an 8 pole switch with 2 simply because the switch is lit. My issue is i need to use it to operate an actuator and i need the push button because it needs to be used behind a cabinet door, pushing the door to operate the switch. Wired correctly (as i have been told) i cannot get the poles to reverse (the actuator to retract) The wiring configuration is simply using the centre terminal NO1 for the load (the actuator in this case) with power running to all 6 other terminals. Direct to the light and NC1 then bridged and polarity reversed from NC1 to the C1 terminals. I guess im showing my level of knowledge with my explanation. I was under the impression in purchasing the switch that upon pressing i could wire it to start the actuator, and upon depressing the switch the actuator would close. (Poles reverse) Hopefully someone can help.....?

Am i simply trying to use a switch that cannot be used here? Again, forgive me, learning and many tell me this switch works but as i try to explain....

Thankyou in advance if anyone can help ☺

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    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to EE.SE. You have some terminology mixed up. Please provide a photo of the switch and a link to the datasheet. You haven't even provided a part number. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jul 8 '17 at 8:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi. I'm having a problem understanding "...that upon pressing i could wire it to start the actuator, and upon depressing the switch the actuator would close." Ah! Do you mean releasing rather than depressing and does close mean retract? \$\endgroup\$ – Paul Uszak Jul 8 '17 at 12:58
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You need to determine the exact type of pushbutton switch.

Momentary contact switch: push to turn on, release to turn off

Push-on, push-off switch: push to turn on, push again to turn off

Push-pull switch: push to turn on, pull to turn off

Normally-Open (NO) contact: Open when off, closed when on

Normally-Closed (NC) contact: Closed when off. open when on

You may need a continuity tester to determine how the switch functions.

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