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I'm trying to create a device which uses bluetooth 4 or Wifi Direct to send gyroscope readings from my device to a PC.

I know nothing of bluetooth and wifi chips and protocols, but I was thinking of using a Broadcom BCM4330 chip, yet I can't find any development boards or any way to purchase the chip so I can test it.

What would you recommend I buy in order to make a prototype device with a bluetooth chip, and a USB receiver dongle for the PC? Could you guide me in the right direction to learn more about these things?

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    \$\begingroup\$ I'd suggest Arduino + XBee, but only because I know a few people who've had good experiences with that combination. \$\endgroup\$ – Polynomial May 12 '12 at 13:37
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You can call Broadcom for direct technical support on kits, but often its best to get your local distributor and buyer involved for getting the right attention.

Here is a list of kits relevant to the BCM4330 with Bluetooth 4.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Unless you know for sure, I suspect you can't just call Broadcom technical support and get anyone to help you. As far as I can tell, the company is structured to only deal with a small number of large customers. They are not a general purpose chip vendor where you can get help with 1-off projects. I once had a project with volumes in the 10s of k range, and they wouldn't even send me a protocol spec document. If you're not going to buy 1M chips, they probably won't talk to you. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop May 13 '12 at 13:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Agreed Olin, as having worked with big and large companies, it takes leverage often to get info and Distributors have more leverage than one buyer. Engineers don't learn this trick until they escalate the issue. I recall working at a small 50 man company but I was able to get any info I needed knowing this fact including direct communication with Motorola HC05 design engineers. But anyone who is wishing for answers need to consider products higher up the food chain, (PCA's), as these low cost comm devices are complex and only for high consumption whales with > $1m diets as per @OlinLathrop \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 13 '12 at 19:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ That being said, their marketing division will be highly motivated to expand the adoption of their new chips which employ both BT4 and WiFi, for smart phone and automotive industry. But chances of support in Serbia are as good as flying to Mars. But you will never succeed unless you ask. broadcom.com/contact/information_request.php \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 13 '12 at 19:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the extensive info! I'm beyond satisfied. Could you recommend a different chip which is easier to actually test and buy? It can be a pure BT4 chip. The device I'm building is kind of like a wireless mouse. \$\endgroup\$ – pontifexmaximus May 13 '12 at 21:52

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