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Let's take a look at the following animation demonstrating time division multiplexing.

Animation demonstrating time division multiplexing Source

As you can see and probably know, the image is shown by displaying one line after another in rapid succession.

The whole image is made up of separate entities. Taking an analogy from video, you could call these entities "frames". But, when using a multiplexed display, you may want to display videos/animations, so an ambiguity issue arises. So, when writing (and later on reading) code regarding this, it is hard to distinguish between "video-frames" and "multiplexing-frames", using the same term causes a lot of confusion.

What is the correct term for the entity that an image on a multiplexed display is made up of?

In other words, which word would correctly complete the following sentence?

An image on a multiplexed display is made up of multiple _____ that are displayed in rapid succession.

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    \$\begingroup\$ VGA sends signals similar to this to TVs to be displayed. The entire picture once it has been sent is called a frame. Each horizontal line of pixels is called a line. So, an image on a multiplexed display is made up of multiple lines that are displayed in rapid succession. \$\endgroup\$
    – Addison
    Jul 16, 2017 at 15:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ I would call it a line \$\endgroup\$
    – Mike
    Jul 16, 2017 at 15:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Addison Oh, that's good to know that the term "line" is actually being used in the industry. My display is charlieplexed, so one "line" isn't an actual line visually, but if there's nothing better than that I'll use it. \$\endgroup\$
    – iFreilicht
    Jul 16, 2017 at 15:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Then "points" or "pixels" would maybe be more relevant for you, because of the charlieplexing. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 16, 2017 at 16:34

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