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I'm doing a project and have one small problem. My project calls for two 2.2uF capacitors, I only have one. I have plenty of 1uF capacitors, three 10uF capacitors and two 100uF caps. Can I use three 1uF caps in series or can I use one of the 10uF caps instead?

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    \$\begingroup\$ You need to connect your capacitors in paralell. Check voltage rating for each, check for ESR requirements. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Jul 28 '17 at 21:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ ok thank you, i don't know why i didn't ask series or parallel. \$\endgroup\$ – Jon Jul 28 '17 at 21:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ Stick two 1uf cap in parallel. Should be good enough. If whatever you're doing requires several amps to flow through the caps then I'd be cautious and make sure that the ESR isn't too high. omg did he just say flow through the caps? - Why yes I did. Make sure the capacitors are rated for the same voltage as well. \$\endgroup\$ – Harry Svensson Jul 28 '17 at 21:18
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It depends on project. As long as the ESR, voltage rating, etc are comparable then it is probably ok. In some instances parallel capacitors results in lower ESR that may help you (lower ESR ripple at the output of a switching regulator), or hurt you (some LDOs will go unstable).

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schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

Connect the 1uF in parallel and you'll get 2uF. Use 2 pair of 2uF in your project.

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For exactly 2.2uF, do this way:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

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    \$\begingroup\$ 2 or 3uF is probably okay, depending on what the capacitor is for. \$\endgroup\$ – user253751 Nov 30 '19 at 11:27

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