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I successfully opened the battery of my laptop without damaging the case, and now, I want to replace the worn out batteries (2600mAh) with more powerful ones (3200mAh).

I know the risks of working with lithium batteries. I'm an electronics engineer, but I don't know if the integrated circuit of my battery has a charge capacity limit, and I don't know if it is a good idea to use high capacity batteries, because I never found more than 2600mAh cells in computers (maybe had lower cycle life?). Can I buy NCR or INR batteries if actual cells are ICR? The cells are well known 18650.

I hope you can help me and other people that want to take a chance fixing it instead of buying new and expensive ones (my battery costs 100€ and only lasted 1 year without intensive use...) or cheaper ones with important wear level.

Thanks a lot!

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    \$\begingroup\$ Unlikely. Some has charge counters, but the chip is probably generic and scales to accommodate many different customers needs. Try it and report back! \$\endgroup\$ – winny Aug 10 '17 at 22:09
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It seems unlikely that your charge circuitry will have a limit charge capacity, most of the time it’s only some low and high cutoff voltages, charging current and temperature checks.

Anyway, you should try, if you are careful installing the cells there are no risks in doing it. Why there aren’t more 3200 mAh cells in laptops is a great question, for which I don’t have an answer but I don’t see why they would have significantly less cycles.

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Many charger IC's have a time limit, but it is a very generous limit only intended to kick in if the cells are defective (if the voltage never comes up to the CV level, or if they stay in CV mode without current taper for a very long time). I don't think it will be a problem for you. There could maybe be some issues with the "fuel gauge" circuitry. But hopefully it will learn the capacity of the new cells. If you get erratic readings at first, keep trying to cycle and recharge to see if things improve before giving up.

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