2
\$\begingroup\$

I've noticed some trade/wholesale websites list CAT-X jack sockets separately as the individual numerical version, i.e., (CAT-3 jack socket). I'm aware CAT is a standard, and RJ45 is the socket itself.

So for example, if I were to buy one labelled as a CAT-3 jack socket, and stick a CAT-6 cable in it, does the contact material of the jack really make that much of a difference, that the cable would then only have the throughput of CAT-3?

Or is it just that the materials used for a CAT-6 jack are GUARANTEED to give the full throughput, whereas YMMV with the CAT-3 jack socket.

Thanks!

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

There is also a difference in what thickness of cables the connector can handle. Cat6 cable generally has thicker wires. Connectors labbled as "Cat6" likely had provisions for dealing with these thicker wires.

Take this image as an example (from similar serverfault question):

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

CAT is a cable categorization. So, strictly speaking, there's no "CAT6 jack sockets". Sockets aren't cables.

Anyway, since the important thing about cable categories is the maximum bandwidth that the cable can transport without losses that are too high, it's fair to assume that the vendor wants to say "this is a socket that matches the capabilities of a CAT-X cable".

Connectors typically are pretty critical for the bandwidth of systems. I've not seen a CAT-3 RJ45-connected cable ever. In my experience, it's either not CAT-X anything, CAT-2 (typical ISDN line), or CAT5 or more.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Actually RJ45 is how it is electrically connected, the connector is a "Modular 8P8C", but its a normal misunderstanding.

And Yes it is the same connector except there is also variants that are shielded.

Ref.: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_connector

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Note that CAT-2 cabling had only two twisted pairs, whereas what is commonly known as "Ethernet cable" today has four. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Sep 2 '17 at 13:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.