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Are Eco-Halogen bulbs a distinct type of light-bulb, or are they just halogen light-bulbs marketed as being eco-friendly?

I recently shattered the outer glass envelope on an Energizer-brand Eco-Halogen light-bulb, and I'm wondering if there's any need for a special clean-up, or if it's alright just to pick up the shards and throw them out, as one would do with a normal Halogen light-bulb.

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closed as off-topic by PeterJ, Dmitry Grigoryev, laptop2d, Dave Tweed Sep 30 '17 at 12:34

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  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – PeterJ, Dmitry Grigoryev, laptop2d, Dave Tweed
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Nope, it's just a branding of halogen bulb, which is still an incandescent bulb. They shouldn't have mercury or anything like that, nor should it have any phosphors, just a glaze if it has that.

In any case you did not break the inner envelope, the outer envelope is only there because the inner one gets really hot.

Clean up normally and throw it in the trash with the LEDs. (Assuming an LED ever failed.)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ That's not an assumption, it's pretty much a certainty. \$\endgroup\$ – Dmitry Grigoryev Sep 12 '17 at 12:27
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Most likely these are halogen bulbs with a iodine/xenon gas filling and an infrared coating. They need less electrical energy to reach their operating temperature than older halogen bulbs, but are still wasting a lot of energy.

If you need a continous light spectrum (Ra=100%), e.g. for photography, these are the ones you have to buy. For all other applications, LED bulbs are way better.

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... you mean, you have not cleaned it up yet? just kidding...

Splash water on it?

It's the quartz glass envelope of the halogen gas pressure that is only dangerous from exploding glass at high temp. Since the fused quartz withstands a higher temperature , The tungsten is hotter and whiter light and more efficient than regular tungsten bulbs, so it may say 42 (60) meaning equiv in lumens to a 60W tungsten bulb but the Bromine or Iodine injected inert gas Halagoen bulb only uses the 1st number in watts but still less efficacy than modern FL tubes and LED bulbs.

Halogen/tungsten filaments operate up to 3400'K while Tungsten operates near 2400'K, both in an inert gas.

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