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So I bought a SEGA CD off ebay and everything was fine until I decided that the duct tape that was holding the battery is was a poor substitute for a battery holder.

So I took my Model 1 apart begun to unsolder the joints that held the battery down. However, one of the parts snapped off and my attempts to empty the hole and remove the remains may have damaged it in the process. Below pictures of the hole that may be damaged. enter image description hereenter image description here I've tried applying more solder and removing, solder wick, solder sucker, nothing. I will admit I put my iron directly on top of it hoping it would melt the solder inside causing the pin to drop out but that didn't work.

At this point, I'm considering using a small drill or a jewelers filer to clean out the hole however I'm only considering this last option which I will probably put off for a while due to how uncomfortable I am of using them on a PCB. So basically, what are my options? What can I do to save the PCB? Can I simply drill or clear out that hole with a drill/filer and fill it with solder to fix it?

Edit:I'm using a 25W Soldering Iron. Picture was linked in comments.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Please post a pic of your solder iron tip. \$\endgroup\$ – pgvoorhees Sep 15 '17 at 11:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ And please tell us the power of the soldering iron. Even though that pad has thermal expansion, it could be difficult if you try using a 15-W soldering iron. \$\endgroup\$ – next-hack Sep 15 '17 at 12:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ Try heating the pad from one end, and use solder pump from other end of the PCB. Always works!! PS: I don't think it is damaged, just that the pad is filled with solder \$\endgroup\$ – Sachin Sep 15 '17 at 12:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm using a 25W Solder. Here's a picture of the Solder i.imgur.com/Z2z2KjS.jpg \$\endgroup\$ – Cfusion Sep 15 '17 at 12:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ @derstrom8 good point, I would also encourage the OP to use a generous amount of flux on the board. \$\endgroup\$ – Minho Sep 21 '17 at 14:46
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The hole may still contain part of the leg that was originally soldered there. In addition, because the hole is attached to a plane you will need significant heat in your soldering iron to keep the solder hot enough to properly melt into a sufficient fluid to soak it up with wick.

Try heating it again with a little bit of fresh solder that contains flux till it melts all the way through, then with a suitably thin piece of single strand wire, poke it through the hole till while keeping the heat on till it clears whatever is still in the hole. Then keep pushing, or pull the wire through the hole. The wire should eventually take the remaining solder with it.

It is important the tip is hot enough and large enough to have a decent contact area. If your tip is too small, or you are too aggressive and apply too much force you will just auger out the pad which is bad.

If the board is double sided, drilling through is an option, but if it is multi-layer I would advise against this, especially if the pad connects to the inner layers or planes.

Once you clear the hole, install the new part and carefully solder from both sides then check the connections with your ohm-meter. If need be add a jumper wire to the nearest good trace or plane. You may need to scrape off some etch resist with a knife to do so.

ADDITION: Since that looks like a tandem connection, i.e. both go to the same place, if one is damaged electrically (e.g pad on one side only) you may get away with using it without rework, though mechanically it will be weaker.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ In regards to if too much force is applied? What do you mean by "auger out the pad"? Pardon the noobish question since I've only just started soldering. Does that simply mean the pad is damaged beyond repair? \$\endgroup\$ – Cfusion Sep 15 '17 at 12:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Cfusion If you press too hard while rotating or wiggling the tip you will actually drill out the pad.. \$\endgroup\$ – Trevor_G Sep 15 '17 at 12:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Okay. In case I do apply too much force by accident, can it be fixed? \$\endgroup\$ – Cfusion Sep 15 '17 at 12:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Cfusion see last two paragraphs of my anwer. \$\endgroup\$ – Trevor_G Sep 15 '17 at 12:23
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The normal way is to resolder and trying to remove any remnants in the hole. If you tried this already i propose following.

Try to find out if there is a hidden pcb track ( Multi layer pcb). If not proceed as follows. Carefully drill through the rivet to remove rivet parts inside. Then it should be possible to desolder the top rivet parts on both sides.

Place a new rivet (ebay) and solder the same in place. If no rivet you could place the new holder and solder it on both sides of the pcb. Maybe you have to cut some material from the holder but it might work

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Your iron might be an issue as pointed by @DerStrom8.

I will admit I put my iron directly on top of it hoping it would melt the solder inside causing the pin to drop out but that didn't work.

This never works.

But if you have another soldering iron, you could try heating the pad from one end, let the solder melt, and suck the melted solder using solder pump from other end of PCB. Maybe you'll need to repeat this exercise twice but this method is tried and tested. Always works!!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I hate solder pumps... I always seems to need a third hand to use them... \$\endgroup\$ – Trevor_G Sep 16 '17 at 12:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Trevor: With some practice, it really isn't that hard. I do it every now and then. Also you can consider using these google.co.in/… \$\endgroup\$ – Sachin Sep 16 '17 at 12:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes I do see the techs use them a lot so I know they work, I guess I just don't have need to do it often enough to be skilled at it. Seen me holding the PCB between my knees while using the pump and iron before LOL \$\endgroup\$ – Trevor_G Sep 16 '17 at 12:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Trevor: Haha!! I've been there many times. That's a makeshift PCB Holder ;) \$\endgroup\$ – Sachin Sep 16 '17 at 12:55

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