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I have to access the 'small' part of soldered header pins. Female jumpers cannot be placed there as the small part is too small. So i thought extending the small part of the header pins so they can fit inside a female jumper.

So i removed the metal part of a header pin and tried to solder it with the small part (the bottom part) of the pin header.

It was really difficult to solder with only two hands, but i managed to do it. The thing is, it has broken two times already. It is too weak. I cannot do it again, only for the frustration it will break again.

So what is the best way to extend a header pin?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You have tried the only viable way to extend a pin, but why go to so much trouble when you can buy headers with equal length pins on both sides. \$\endgroup\$ – Steve G Sep 30 '17 at 18:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ Because it is already soldered. And i cannot deal with unsoldering it. With my equipment, its near impossible. Plus i can damage the board \$\endgroup\$ – user1584421 Sep 30 '17 at 18:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you add a photo of what you are working with? \$\endgroup\$ – Andrew Morton Sep 30 '17 at 19:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Instead of trying to solder a new connector, can you use crown or cup Pogo Pins? \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Ryding Sep 30 '17 at 22:43
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enter image description here

Figure 1. Double-sided header pins.

Get some of the double-sided header pins and solder these to the underside of the board. It may be a bit tall but electrically will be OK.

Cut the strip to length, tin each of the pins, line it up with the pins on your PCB and tack-solder to the highest pin on your PCB. Then connect the end pins to the PCB pins. Finish off the rest.

It may be stronger and easier if you mount the extensions behind the existing pin stubs so that they're almost touching the board. That way you will be joining them along along parallel faces rather than just at the ends.

Regarding your soldering skills, you can aspire to this:

enter image description here

Source: Little wire dead-bug art.

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The only real solution is to de-solder the exiting header and install a proper header with equal sized pins. Anything else will not be mechanically strong enough to survive connecting and de-connecting female headers.

Consider this an opportunity to develop and enhance your desoldering skills...or an excuse to get new or better equipment :>)

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I found a solution to my problem. I soldered 90 degree header pins to the existing standard header pins.

Like these:

right-angle pins

Source

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