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I have wired some custom USB-C cables from scratch in the past, where the USB-A connector is plugging in to a host PC. If I wired a USB cable where the USB-C connector was plugging into a host receptacle (a USB-C to Mini-USB cable for example), would there be any additional wires/pins that need to be connected in order for the cable to function properly? Typically, I am using a 4-wire cable, connecting VBUS, Ground, D+ and D- pins.

Thanks in advance!

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If you want the cable to act as Type-C host to mini-B plug (to plug into a device with mini-B receptacle), you should connect A5 pin to ground via 5.1k 5% resistor inside the Type-C overmold. This will inform the Type-C host that the cable is "a device". Although the mini-B is not in the official list of allowable cables in Type-C specifications, you can use the wiring schema for Typ-C to micro-B plug, it is there, and mini-B is one-to-one wired to micro-B.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I may not be able to do this with the connectors I have, not sure. Here is a picture of what I'm working with: imgur.com/a/RSkxc Wiring directly to the tiny pin may be an option, but I don't trust my hand steadfastness enough for that :) \$\endgroup\$ – rockwell Oct 2 '17 at 19:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @rockwell, this connector-interposer should already have footprints for 0603 SMT chip resistors, for two options - for a "host end" (5k1 to ground), and for "device end" (56k to VBUS). Do some reverse engineering of this little PCB. \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Oct 2 '17 at 19:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, the connector has two little SMT chips already on there (with one empty), but frankly I don't understand what they do. I guess that's part of what I'm trying to understand. \$\endgroup\$ – rockwell Oct 2 '17 at 19:56

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