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Looking for a low cost implementation to post ambient temperature readings from a sensor to servers via a COTS router.

1) Have a temperature sensor connected to a micro controller which sends data via a Wifi Module with a TCP/IP Stack to servers 2) Have a temperature sensor communicated via Zigbee to a coordinator that is plugged into a router and communicates with the servers.

Would like to keep the cost of the solution below $20. Another constraint is the battery life. Wifi modules with TCP/IP consume more power and cost more.

What particular devices/chips/microcontrollers would you recommend to solve my data communication problem and fit within my budget?

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    \$\begingroup\$ very close to this question I asked here \$\endgroup\$ – Matt Jun 5 '12 at 21:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ Elaborate more on the power requirements. Is this device unable to be powered by a wall-wart, etc? Since it's wireless, how far away will the device be placed from the router? Is it going to be outdoors or indoors? \$\endgroup\$ – Toby Lawrence Jun 5 '12 at 22:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ I wrote up a blog entry on getting from an analog sensor to the internet (Pachube) via Ethernet (with a Nanode) over an inexpensive, low power RF link (Wicked Node / Receiver Shield) a while ago: blog.wickeddevice.com/?p=244... but under $20 is a tall order. \$\endgroup\$ – vicatcu Jun 6 '12 at 1:40
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I would use a Digi Xbee on the sensor to pass the information to a Connectport X2, which has either ethernet or wifi. The Xbee is a Zigbee radio with a simple serial interface. The X2 has a Zigbee radio and an IP connection and runs python.

There are several tutorials on how to get one working. This one looks like a good place to start.

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If you're not in a hurry, you can wait for the new Electric Imp kits. The developer kits should be coming out soon. (Says "end of June, 2012" on the website).

http://electricimp.com/docs/gettingstarted/devkits/


The Hannah: The hobbyist board even has the temperature sensor built in.

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Pachube / Cosm, which is now called Xively, is a service/platform/API for posting sensor data to the web. If you click on Support/API and then go to hardware, they have a lot of information on the various hardware that is compatible with their service. And they have libraries for controllers like the Arduino.

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