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I am using this in my Arduino board to transfer data via Bluetooth.

I wanted to know, how is it poosible to receive data sent by this BT on the PC using C#. What sort of a communication would it be?

Because Serial data is transmitted by this BT, how am I going to receive this data in a C# application.

Please help. I'm a newbie

Thanks

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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because is is ancient, it has no accepted answer, and the asking user hasn't visited the in 9 years so no answer ever will be accepted. Brought because of a proposed edit to one of the answers. The answer itself is the highest voted, but is a link only answer. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE May 9 at 16:22
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Here's a tutorial on C# serial comms.

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/serialcommunication.aspx

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi, in addition to putting RN41 on Arduino board, I would be using a Bluetooth Dongel on my desktop to communicate with Arduino, right? So, do you mean that the dongel would communicate serially on a COM port with the computer? Thanks \$\endgroup\$ – Johnny Jul 9 '10 at 5:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Electric_90 please stop making pointless edits to old posts, all you accomplish is getting them closed. Further your attempted link hiding is detrimental, especially if the link should rot it is easier to relocate the resource when the original URL is visible. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton May 10 at 12:53
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To add onto Joby's answer.

Many bluetooth solutions I have used allow you to have tunneled serial. This means that you will just see a com port.

Advanced warning. I have installed drivers for this before and they resulted in about 15 COM ports existing on my computer. They just hang out and annoy me when I am not using bluetooth and am using a different serial port, like an FTDI chip.

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You have a few options. I'll start by saying that to spy on a Bluetooth connection already in progress is very difficult unless you have access to one of the connected peers. By access, I mean the ability to start up a Bluetooth stack sniffer. I don't know of one for Windows, so we're left with Linux.

Option 1: "Linux option"

"Sniff" the traffic on the Bluetooth connection in Linux, simply run this command:

hcidump -X

Which will dump all Bluetooth I/O to and from your PC to the screen.

Option 2: "Electronics option"

Another, more electronics oriented solution is to spy on the I/O communications on one of the peers.

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