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I've lost a cable for a multi-USB charger. The port looks like:

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I'm looking for a replacement 110V/1.5A cable but not sure how to describe the connector. Any suggestions?

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That is a C7 connector.

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Figure 1. C7 connector. Source: Wikipedia IEC 60320.

Commonly known as a figure-8 or shotgun connector due to the shape of its cross-section. This coupler is often used for small cassette recorders, battery/mains operated radios, battery chargers, some full size audio-visual equipment, laptop computer power supplies, video game consoles, and similar double-insulated appliances.

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If you have experience of pre-computer era, '80 or '90 when we used to listen music recorded on magnetic tape called cassette player would have this AC power connectors all most every device.

We normally call them as 'power cord' if ever needs to buy replacement. Remember, at that time no computer were available as house hold device our known power cord currently common to desktop PC was not in store.

Anyway, as my previous user already mentioned the stuff as C7 connector, which also called shotgun connector. Along with device he mentions you will likely find this connectors used in small AC powered devices with low power consumption.

There are same type of connectors used in DC power but they will have protection as DC required polarity correctly. Although size and shape of same thing for DC looks similar, buying that will not work as polarity protector will make impossible to plug such cord in device designed for AC power. AC power cord will have shotgun looks but DC will have one side matching cut for polarity check. Be careful, DC male jack will accept AC power cord without warning...

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