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Sorry for the title, I have problems putting it to words in English.

I ordered some small and cheap Chinese solar panels. I thought it was fun to tinker with them and learn about electricity. After my horrible soldering I found out I want them in series, not parallel and during the resoldering I ruined two of them. Too much heat... and no skills.

Please take a look at the picture. I was wondering is there any way to make a contact again with these empty holes? If I stick my multimeter in the hole, I still get voltage. Probably I didn't break them for good.

chinesium solar panels

I tried to Google the problem, but haven't found answers. Is there some kind of paste or liguid? I cant just stick a wire inside the whole, it doesn't stick.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What equipment do you have available? You could try different soldering strategies for example solder paste with hot air. Alternatively if you know someone who is more confident with a soldering iron you could ask them to do it? \$\endgroup\$
    – loudnoises
    Commented Oct 17, 2017 at 14:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would really like to do it on my own. I will find more info about your strategy, thank you. \$\endgroup\$
    – Badr Hari
    Commented Oct 17, 2017 at 14:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sure! Just some advice: It's usually better to get soldering practice on something with no value to you, you can find pcbs in any old broken electronics or order cheap practice projects. I did this when I was learning SMT soldering and it helped so much! This was after destroying some valuable things though... \$\endgroup\$
    – loudnoises
    Commented Oct 17, 2017 at 14:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I started practicing with leds and simple wires after I ruined my solar panels ; ) I do things in wrong order. \$\endgroup\$
    – Badr Hari
    Commented Oct 17, 2017 at 14:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Small nuts and bolts... \$\endgroup\$
    – Solar Mike
    Commented Oct 17, 2017 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

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There are all kinds of things that you can try. Usually there's a trade-off between ease of use, and reliability.

How about conductive epoxy? Perhaps too expensive.

Press-fit pin-in-board technology (pressing pins into PCB, and they 'swage' into place).

from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swaging#Electronics

"In printed circuit board assembly individual connector pins are sometimes pressed/swaged into place using an arbor press. Some pins have a hollow end that is pressed over by the arbor's tool to form a mushroom-shaped retaining head. Typical pin diameter range from 0.017 to 0.093 inches or larger. The swaging is an alternative or supplement to soldering."

However, the pin and pcb need to be purposefully engineered for this.

Sometimes a solution for this type of problem is to locate another access point on the pcb that you can take advantage of, and solder a wire onto that location.

Ultimately the solution is to practice soldering, especially managing heat. Learn how to use heat-sinks to control heat flow while soldering. Use the proper iron temperature and flux for the solder and materials in use.

Good luck,

Chris

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for your suggestions! I have now practiced soldering a lot! Probably should have done so beforehand. I will look into conductive epoxy, I did search before but it all looked very expensive. Maybe I can try to make my own with some kind of metal powder? \$\endgroup\$
    – Badr Hari
    Commented Oct 17, 2017 at 14:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ I solved it using good old super glue. It doesn't look very solid, but it works. If anyone finds this thread while Googling, put baking soda on top of super glue so it will harden in a second. Otherwise you have to wait and the contact might get loose. \$\endgroup\$
    – Badr Hari
    Commented Oct 17, 2017 at 23:47
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If the copper is reasonably intact, then a temporary approach would be to use spring-loaded test clips. If you want something more permanent, then spring probes, of the sort for testing circuit boards, mounted on a custom-made jig, to hold the board in the correct position.

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