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I have a small GSM Modem whose internal antenna sucks. I bought a small external antenna that boosted the signal a little, however I want to boost it more. Would using a typical high frequency audio amplifier that is connected to a satellite antenna boost the signal?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Depends. Is your satellite antenna a satellite dish? Google will give you plenty of examples here. The wavelength for 900 MHz GSM is not well suited for a 10 GHz satellite dish but better than nothing. 1800/1900 MHz GSM and especially 3G will "see" the dish quite well when I experimented. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Oct 17 '17 at 19:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Audio frequency = 20,000 Hz. GSM frequency = 850,000,000 Hz. The audio amp will stop working far before it reaches those frequencies of GSM. \$\endgroup\$ – horta Oct 17 '17 at 20:54
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Would using a typical high frequency audio amplifier that is connected to a satellite antenna boost the signal?

No, absolutely not. In fact it would make things worse.

An audio amplifier has absolutely no capability at the (near/-) microwave frequencies used by GSM. Quite likely it will function as a very effective attenuator and block almost all of the signal that a plain coaxial antenna cable would have let through.

Further, GSM is a bidirectional communication scheme, so an amplifier would need to have coordination or subband-specific behavior with the transmit/receiver behavior of the base radio. Further, cellularized networks depend on the base station commanding the mobile device's power output to a level which will achieve communication, but not interfere with frequency re-use in other cells.

Such a device is not only going to be ineffective, if it were effective, it would probably not be legal.

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