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I'm trying to figure out how much silver is theoretically needed per kWh for a silver-zinc battery.

From this data page, I gathered the following:

enter image description here

But I don't know which of those equations are used in primary and secondary silver batteries. And I don't know how to plug in the electropotential number into some equation to figure out how much silver can hold how many joules or kWh of energy storage.

BTW I did see this question and someone's recommendation to put it on Chemistry.SE, but I clicked that link and found it removed/migrated from there. So that is why I post it here.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You will later find out that these numbers will mean next to nothing to a real world battery since all boils down to availability for a reaction for a desired ampacity. \$\endgroup\$ – PlasmaHH Oct 20 '17 at 7:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ @PlasmaHH Isn't there some kind of efficiency factor you can multiply? For the really good batteries like Li-Ion and Silver-Zinc, I hope the factor is high. \$\endgroup\$ – DrZ214 Oct 20 '17 at 7:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sure there is, but it depends on the actual makeup of the battery and can vary widely. Besides actual chemistry (electrolytes, carrier substances, membranes) surface area is key. \$\endgroup\$ – PlasmaHH Oct 20 '17 at 8:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ @PlasmaHH I agree, but at least one could find the minimum theoretical quantity (i.e. assuming a single-atom layer of silver, and other ideal case approximations) of mass of Ag per kWh. \$\endgroup\$ – next-hack Oct 20 '17 at 10:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ @next-hack: For that you would just multiply the voltage potential by the number of possibly reacting atoms. \$\endgroup\$ – PlasmaHH Oct 20 '17 at 11:02
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Since in batteries only the Anode withers away(for example Copper/Zinc battery) you could just use Silver plated copper instead and in Batteries the surface area of the cathode/anode and not how much the metal weights is what determines the Amp/hour ratings

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    \$\begingroup\$ Actually, this is not the silver version of the Daniell cell! The cathode is AgO, originally produced by oxidizing the Ag electrode when the cell was first charged during manufacture. In operation, AgO ultimately gets reduced at the cathode to Ag. See this wikipedia article for more information: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_zinc_battery \$\endgroup\$ – Ed V Jul 21 at 14:07

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