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I am looking into buying some 5W LED 3000k GU10 spotlights with a rating of 450 lumens, for my gypsum soffits. The only part which is confusing me is what viewing angle I should get. I have found a lot for sale with a viewing angle of 60 degrees, 90 degrees or 120 degrees. However I am not sure which to opt for. At the moment, the best deal which I found is on a viewing angle of 120 degrees. Would it be a good choice?

Below is a plan of how my spotlights are laid out. The main bedroom already has 4 spotlights which are not shown on the plan.

Would 120 degrees work for these rooms? Or else, should I get different viewing angles for different rooms?

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closed as off-topic by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Bimpelrekkie, Leon Heller, pipe, winny Oct 24 '17 at 9:16

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  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Bimpelrekkie, Leon Heller, pipe
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Voted off-topic as this has nothing to do with EE. Also not seeing how someone else's advise helps here as I we could advise the most stupid option but you have to live with that. What you should choose comes down to personal preference as well. Would you also like some advise about what you should have for dinner tonight? \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Oct 24 '17 at 8:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Bimpelrekkie Hopefully I'll be able to see the food with the right viewing angle from the lights :) \$\endgroup\$ – MathLover Oct 24 '17 at 8:29
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120 degrees is more of a floodlight than a spotlight. I replaced the halogen GU10's in my kitchen for 120 degree LED lamps and really hated the effect - it was like having fluorescent tubes that give really flat lighting. I swapped them for 45 degree LEDs (which are similar to standard halogens) and was much happier. In a bedroom I think you want the spotlight effect, so I'd go for the around 45 to 50 degrees. Also, 5W may be far too bright for a bedroom, so either use 3W or make them dimmable - you should make sure the LED lamps are dimmable, not all are.

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Many ceiling pot lights cause extreme spot glare. I would want to eliminate glare by 1 of two methods ;

Diffuser lens > 8cm fixtures insert to hole in ceiling <20$ Home Depot 8W AC dimmable (160 Deg low CD intensity high Lumen) >800

Recessed in ceiling 30 deg 5Wdc with PWM dimmer such that it is not viewable unless standing under it. This fixture may be harder find but can be DIY with heat rising above ceiling. Vents are essential for convection cooling.

Alternatively, wall and ceiling reflectors give ambient light with additional power near bay windows under kitchen cabinets and recessed perimeter strip LEDs with mini valence to produce indirect perimeter ceiling light 24Vdc with 2-3x 5m strips per DC feed. Choose 3500 to 5000K for warm to natural sunlight.

Basically try to avoid direct view of spot chip.

You can use Geometry to compute span to floor and see that 30 deg is best for your spacing, but try the recess so no edge glare.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So what viewing angle should I look out for, for it to not be in direct view? Would 120 degrees solve this problem? \$\endgroup\$ – MathLover Oct 24 '17 at 8:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Either diffused large lens which is 160 deg or a recessed spot light 30deg is what I said. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Oct 24 '17 at 22:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also, ceiling height is around 2.6m if it makes a difference \$\endgroup\$ – MathLover Oct 26 '17 at 10:25

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