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This is a switched potentiometer from a LED uplight; it has two lights: (1) a switched only lower light controlled by a rotary switch, and (2) a switched and dimmed one for the upper light controlled by a switched potentiometer. This has failed (knob turns continually, no switching action) so the upper light won’t switch on. It’s a 20v circuit. I’ve taken out the (really cheap) switched potentiometer as shown and have included pics of the circuit board. I’ve got a multimeter but am not sure what to measure as the rotary action of the pot is mashed up internally. The only marking on it is "B1K" as shown. If anyone has any idea how to identify this I would be really grateful! If it comes to it, I could replace it with another rotary switch and lose the dimming function.

Pot

Pot

Pot

Circuit board front

Circuit board back

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    \$\begingroup\$ Possibly this is just the knob that is internally "broken" and no longer makes contact with the potentiometer. You could unply the four edges retaining the pink piece. You can then remove it, and verify that the potentiometer still works. You can probably apply some glue or do some other mechanical repair. You can surely also measure the resistor value of the potentiometer because you removed it. \$\endgroup\$ – le_top Nov 2 '17 at 1:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Just a reminder. We don't do repair questions here. \$\endgroup\$ – Oskar Skog Nov 2 '17 at 4:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ B1K -> R1K (resistance, 1k ohm) \$\endgroup\$ – gbarry Aug 20 '18 at 4:16
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The switched pot is a 1 kohm linear pot. Most switched pots are log used in old school volume controls. Switched pots are less reliable than unswitched ones. The exact part may be hard to find. You could consider a seperate switch.

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Well, probably 1000 ohms. Looks like a typical Chinese brand but I do't know which one.

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