0
\$\begingroup\$

When soldering MCU (Arduino and like) to perforated board I apply solder only to the pins in use, leaving the unused ones just sitting in the hole. I do this to minimize soldering accidents. The headers themselves had all their pins soldered to the chip.

It's this a good practice?

\$\endgroup\$
6
  • \$\begingroup\$ What exactly to you mean by "The headers themselves had all their pins soldered to the chip." ? Are we talking about soldering a DIP package onto a perfboard (in which case a socket might be a good option) or are you talking about soldering a whole arduino board to some other board (in which case some kind of connector would be the thing to go). \$\endgroup\$
    – PlasmaHH
    Nov 2, 2017 at 8:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ @PlasmaHH. I buy MCUs like Arduino Pro Mini that comes in a plastic bag (MCU + unsoldered headers). I solder the headers to the MCU (all the pins) first thing, to have it available for whatever project I need one. Later I solder it to the perforated board. I don't use a socket (or female headers) out of laziness, to be honest. \$\endgroup\$
    – user83628
    Nov 2, 2017 at 8:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ So by "MCU" you don't actually mean microcontroller, which would just be the chip, but you mean the whole board? In that case really you should use the female headers, it is as much work as soldering the other pins. \$\endgroup\$
    – PlasmaHH
    Nov 2, 2017 at 9:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, yes, the "whole" board. \$\endgroup\$
    – user83628
    Nov 2, 2017 at 9:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ With some practice and good tools, soldering of header pins with 100 mil (2.54 mm) pitch is no problem. You don't have to fear soldering accidents. \$\endgroup\$
    – Uwe
    Nov 2, 2017 at 10:01

3 Answers 3

2
\$\begingroup\$

No, it's not good practice. Obviously, the header will be better fixated mechanically if you solder all pins.

For this kind of task, I'd expect very little soldering mistakes to happen, so go ahead and do it.

Furthermore, this is confusion waiting to happen if you decide later on that you want to use a pin you haven't soldered yet.

\$\endgroup\$
7
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, the pin is in place (soldered to the MCU); I can solder it to the board and add a wire afterwards. I want the be able to unsolder and recycle my MCU for another projects. \$\endgroup\$
    – user83628
    Nov 2, 2017 at 8:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ You didn't mention that in the question :) so, I'd say: go and edit your question to include that info. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 2, 2017 at 8:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ You must be using very expensive MCUs! And in that case, why not use a socket? \$\endgroup\$ Nov 2, 2017 at 8:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @WoutervanOoijen. It's not the cost; it' the time. Buying a $1 MCU can take a month in the mail (or a 8-hours drive to big city). \$\endgroup\$
    – user83628
    Nov 2, 2017 at 8:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcusMüller. I think I wrote that "The headers themselves ..." Not native speaker, sorry for the confusion. \$\endgroup\$
    – user83628
    Nov 2, 2017 at 8:30
0
\$\begingroup\$

That's fine for prototyping, the only downside is the reduced mechanical strength.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

You can do it, but you have to take mechanical resistance into account.

What I do is solder all the pins I use, plus pins on both ends. on a 2.54mm pitch (like the arduino headers) soldering accident should not happen (assuming decent equipment and careful operator), but not soldering every single pin makes rework/desoldering easier.

Since an Arduino is prototyping work, mechanical resistance does not have to be perfect anyway, and you can always solder the rest once the project is finished.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I don't think you mean "mechanical resistance". Maybe mechanical "integrity", or "strength" or some such. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 2, 2017 at 16:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ScottSeidman - How about "mechanical unmating forces"? Especially in light of the possiblity that (depending on which pins are soldered and which not) the forces can be asymmetrical, leading to higher forces on some pins. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 2, 2017 at 19:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ScottSeidman I don't know, i am not a native english speaker and this seem a bit too subtle for me. feel free to edit. \$\endgroup\$
    – Sclrx
    Nov 2, 2017 at 22:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.