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I don't know if this is the most indicated stackexchange site to ask this, but I'll give it a try:

I know 902-928 MHz is part of ISM band, and I know for sure it is a free band to use in Region 2 (USA, Canada...).

I am in Region 1, Europe. I have searched for a while and I haven't found anything clear. It would be so nice to have an intuitive web to look for bands availability by countries, but I only know where to look the ones for my country (Spain), and it's not very clear either.

Anyway, I think GSM-900 is into that band in Europe, so 902-928 would not be usable for other practises. Am I right?

It is intended to be used onto an aircraft, so I don't know if regulations change for that kind of uses.

Any help?

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First a clarification from the ITU:

G013. What is meant by ISM applications and how are the related frequencies used?

The term "unregulated frequencies" is not used within ITU texts. What is often meant by the term "unregulated frequencies" is the frequency bands for industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) applications.

Europe doesn't use the 900 MHz band, but 868 MHz (the full ISM band is 863 to 870 Mhz).
(source)

Note that some sources will refer to 868 MHz as ISM, while other will refer to the more general SRD (Short Range Device).

Further reading
ISM-Band and Short Range Device Regulatory Compliance Overview

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I've read somewhere that 868 MHz is not ISM, although free to use \$\endgroup\$ – clabacchio Jun 13 '12 at 8:42
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You're right, in the Region 1, where Europe is, the 915 MHz band is not free. The alternative ISM band is the 433.9 MHz band (not all countries).

The 802.15.4 protocol uses the 868 MHz band, as Steven pointed, which provide one channel, and the more common 2.4 GHz band, with 16 channels.

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