0
\$\begingroup\$

I have read about Nickel-Iron batteries and from what I have understood they have very long life and large cycles. They are heavier than lead-acid batteries, but even lead acid cells are used in places where weight doesn't matter much.

So, my question is why don't manufacturers innovate or develop this chemistry much? I guess the cost is due to the limited production. Is it because of the long life manufacturers hesitate to produce it which will reduce profit due to reduced replacement cycles? Also this cell chemistry doesn't have any toxic heavy metals either.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ "poor charge retention" D8 \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 7 '17 at 19:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ the answer to such question is typically "because chemistry and technology wouldn't allow it. It's a complex mix of reasons." It's generally not a great idea to ask why something complicated is not done! Think about it: Why aren't cars perfect spheres? Uh, many reasons. Why don't we use Iron-Lemon juice batteries? There's a lot of things why! \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Nov 7 '17 at 20:00
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams Yes, I am aware about that. That is what kept me thinking. Most of the battery chemistries that we use today like the NiMH have had very high discharge in the past, but with t e research and development they have low self-discharge cells now. \$\endgroup\$ – The_Vintage_Collector Nov 7 '17 at 20:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcusMüller Yes its kinda complex question with lot of variables. But this battery chemistry is something that we have in use today, but only for very few limited applications. Manufacturers see to have advanced a lot on other chemistries a lot but left this one behind. I am thinking maybe its something to do with their profits being lost from very long life without needing replacement. \$\endgroup\$ – The_Vintage_Collector Nov 7 '17 at 20:06
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Did you Google iron-nickle and lead-acid batteries? Did you compare the information you found there? Why did that not answer your question? \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Nov 8 '17 at 1:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.