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I want to make a circuit that converts Direct current to Alternate current. Is it possible at home without using any expensive resources. I know I have to use some resources but I want this as simple as one can.

DC to AC

I know how to convert Alternate to Direct current, but for reverse I don't know how to do this. Someone please help if he can.

I don't know more about electronics. I'm a Software Engineer but I have to work with electronics too.

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closed as too broad by winny, Lior Bilia, PeterJ, Nick Alexeev Dec 1 '17 at 19:52

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ This circuit is called an inverter. Before you design one, you need to decide, how what voltage, current, and frequency you want it to operate at. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Nov 23 '17 at 5:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also, before you make an inverter to supply a device that expects mains voltages, you want to be sure you know enough to do it without electrocuting yourself. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Nov 23 '17 at 5:53
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    \$\begingroup\$ If by this you just mean "Can I make an AC sine wave using DC to power it?" then it's not so hard. One or two BJTs can get there. If you want it to actually drive a load such as a speaker with a dozen watts of power, at least another 5 BJTs and a larger DC power supply rail. If you want it to actually provide AC power capable of driving motors, then you want an inverter and it's a much bigger problem. Given the "simple as one can" comment, I'd say you need to focus merely on producing a reasonable sine wave into a modest (\$1\:\textrm{k}\Omega\$) load. Two BJTs for that. \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Nov 23 '17 at 6:49
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An inverter can be as simple as a voltage source, few resistors, a pair of NPN and PNP transistors in a totem pole setup, and a transformer. You can totally do this as a diy, but a pre built commercial car inverter would work better at a higher efficiency at a lower cost.

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    \$\begingroup\$ a correct answer given the poor detail in the question... \$\endgroup\$ – Solar Mike Nov 23 '17 at 6:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think the OP needs to be very careful before he/she tries to build one such inverter. A lot of circuits on the Internet shows these transistor-based circuits, which are usually driven by a square wave (IC555, IC4017, etc.). The sharp voltage transitions may cause very high induced voltage in the transformer's secondary coil. \$\endgroup\$ – Vinit Shandilya Nov 29 '17 at 10:00

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