3
\$\begingroup\$

If I have a transformer for 4x20W but I use halogen bulbs let's say 4x60W, why does the transformer burn then? I always thought that the bulbs are only as strong as the transformer gives, but it's the other way around. The transformer tries to give 4x60W and burns after short time.
Why is this so? I'd like to understand the physical background. Is this because the current density becomes too high or something like that?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Saying "a tranformer is as strong as the load" something like thinking that "a rope is as strong as the climber attached to it": First you will be saved by the built in safety margin, and then permanent damage or destruction of the device will be the result. \$\endgroup\$ – 0x6d64 Jun 19 '12 at 9:30
3
\$\begingroup\$

Too low resistance of the bulbs causes too high current in the transformer secondary winding and so the transformer gets overheated. If you short the transformer (extreme of what you have with a too powerful load) the transformer gets burnt even faster (don't try that).

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.