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I'm sorry, I am very new and green to circuitry, and probably frustrating to read. I have a hypothetical question about a circuit with a 6.6 v charging source that is both charging a 3.3 v 100 ah lithium battery and powering a 3.3 v 100 amp load. I have read that chargers with more power output than their circuit batteries will power the load and charge the battery with its excess. I also know that charging lithium batteries must be charged at its stated voltage for safety reasons. My question is concerned with safety and feasibility. Is it possible for this 6.6 v charging source to feasibly power the load at 3.3 v and safely charge the battery at 3.3 v? Thank you for your time and help.

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    \$\begingroup\$ 100A load??? What is this load? \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Dec 7 '17 at 21:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Are you thinking of putting the battery in series with the load? The problem is that the load requires 100A which has to pass through the battery. Assuming that your hypothetical battery can be charged at 100A (and that is unlikely), in 1 hour the battery will be fully charged. Continuing to charge it at 100A will cause it to overheat and explode. Its not a great idea. \$\endgroup\$ – Steve G Dec 7 '17 at 23:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ To add yet another reason why this won't work very well, a 3.3V battery will be less than 3.3V when it's empty and more than 3.3V when it's full. \$\endgroup\$ – Dampmaskin Dec 7 '17 at 23:52
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The question does not have enough detail to allow anyone to give you a definitive answer. A 6.6V charging source can be a control circuit powered by 6.6V but with sufficient circuitry to allow it to charge a lithium battery properly, or it could be just a 6.6 V power supply - there is a huge difference between the two.

In any case, the issue relates more to how much current is being drawn by each load. You can't just hook up a 6.6 power supply to something expecting 3.3V - it will likely self destruct - and it may take you along with it. If the source can supply 200A and each load requires 100A, then that will work fine, as the current will divide, and allow 100A to flow to each device -assuming it can handle the voltage. Think of it as inflating a tire with 60 PSI, when it is rated for 30 PSI. No matter how big or small the compressor (amps) it will eventually explode your tires.

Good Luck

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