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I was modeling current distribution in a component:

enter image description here

And I plotted the \$ \vec{J} \$ to simulate & understand the current distribution throughout the conductor, all the flows make sense, except at the edge of the conductor like so:

enter image description here

Current would distribute all around the area, which is expected. However, one would initially assume that the highest \$ \vec{J} \$ would be going towards the potential difference applied(which is the lower right bar extending to the right of the page) which I would assume is \$1.93 \times 10^7\$, and over the furthest left edges possibly low distribution at \$1.71 \times 10^2\$, but I'm not sure. Is there a way I could figure this out through Maxwell ANSYS? Or should I stick to my intuition here? That the edges would have the lowest current always.

Even when I apply really higher currents(From \$250A\$ to \$250kA\$) the diagram would change to this distribution:

enter image description here

Which leads to the same problem, dark blue being a range of [

\$11.73×10^2\$,\$11.93×10^7\$] My initial assumption is the least amount of current in that scale list is towards the edges in dark-blue.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The current vector right on the edge of the part, can only be parallel to the surface. No current can flow perpendicular to the boundary, the air is not conductive... Rather don't calculate the current there - move the calculation point slightly so it's inside the metal. \$\endgroup\$ – tomnexus Dec 14 '17 at 5:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ Your assumption about the colour scale is correct. It seems the current density is 10000 times smaller in the far corner, than in the thin link at the bottom, that sounds pretty reasonable. \$\endgroup\$ – tomnexus Dec 14 '17 at 5:37
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Since you're using DC Conduction you have no varying field effects (like skin and proximity effects) and have linear material (copper). Whatever excitation current value you're using the current distribution doesn't change qualitatively, but only the quantity of current will be scaled. The J will be the highest closer to the center of the whole thing. You're seeing slight difference when applying higher current due to having manual range of current values, that is why there are so many blue arrows. :) Click twice on scale and change it to auto.

Also you can visualize magnitude of J on the whole thing.

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