3
\$\begingroup\$

I'm investigating developing a board with a USB-C connector, tied to a USB 3.0 hub, which would have various downstream ports connected to an MCU, thumbdrive, etc. My question is about the four pairs of SS TX/RX signals on the connector. I understand the CC pins can be used to determine the connector/cable orientation. So would I need to use switches to select between the TX1/RX1 and TX2/RX2 pairs based on the state of the CC pins, and connect the outputs to the hub? Are there components that incorporate all this (detecting the CC and switching the USB-C signals to provide the SS TX/RX pairs)?

Are the second set of SS pairs used only by USB 3.2 devices?

I'm looking at TUSB8040A from TI currently for the hub, and PI3USB302-A from Diodes for switches. Any thoughts or other suggestions?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Do any of your "MCU, thumbdrive, etc." devices have USB 3.0 interface? \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Dec 16 '17 at 2:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ Not the MCU, but the thumbdrive could. Or I should be clearer - this would be an external type-A receptacle, so it could be an external hard drive, etc. that may support USB 3 \$\endgroup\$ – AngeloQ Dec 16 '17 at 2:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ This question needs to be closed as "too broad" to answer. The answer is given on 240 pages of Type-C specifications, rev.1.3. \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Dec 16 '17 at 3:25
3
\$\begingroup\$

USB Type-C connector should be wired in accord with "USB Type-C connector specifications". The latest specifications are a part of "USB 3.2" package release (zip format), which can be found on USB.org website. The document has 240 pages and explains several variants how the Type-C connector should be wired.

To make it clear, it is not that "CC pins can be used", the CC pins MUST BE USED to determine orientation and proper selection of Tx/Rx pairs for multiplexing.

Since this particular hub doesn't support native Type-C interface, additional ICs must be used. To start, look at Texas Instruments portfolio of Type-C support. Several other companies as Rohm, Fairchildsemi, Cypress, STMicroelectronics, VIA, etc. etc. offer ICs to support Type-C finctionality.

You can also look at hubs that support Type-C multiplexing natively, I believe VIA already makes some (look up VL821).

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.